2-Week Calendar

Printable Version

May 29 - June 4

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

June 5 - 11

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

ALL UPCOMING EVENTS

  • CINEMA
    The Brand New Testament
    Sunday May 29, 8:00p–9:53p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Some may respond strongly to Belgian director Jaco van Dormael's The Brand New Testament’s inspired “what-if” scenario: God (Benoît Poelvoorde, Coco Before Chanel), it turns out, lives among us, or at least in a Brussels three-bedroom apartment, with his unnamed goddess wife (Yolande Moreau, Micmacs, Séraphine, Amélie) and ten-year-old daughter Ea (Pili Groyne, Deux jours, une nuit). In this universe, God is not so much benign or vengeful, but more a heartless bastard, who enjoys nothing more than heaping vexations large and small on the species he created in his own image.

    Perpetually attired in a grey T-shirt and ratty dressing gown, he is an obnoxious bully to his wife and daughter—that is, when he is not busy locked in his office, smoking, boozing and inflicting misery on mankind via his vintage desktop computer.

    After God takes a belt to his daughter, who has never been allowed outside the family home, Ea solicits advice from a her long-lost brother “JC.” The pair devise a plan. Ea is going to get six additional disciples, and listen to them, thus creating a Brand New Testament. Before she can do this, she enacts an ingenious revenge on her father. Hacking into his hard drive, she sends a text message to the mobile phone of every human advising them of their exact date of death, crashes the computer to rob God of any power to cause more mischief, and then breaks out of the apartment prison via a secret portal at the back of the family’s washing machine.

    God, who follows Ea through the portal (which his browbeaten wife immediately seals behind him), finds that he is completely incapable of taking care of himself and is mistaken for a paperless illegal immigrant. His selfish nature repels anyone who tries to help, and the indignities pile up.

    As Ea gathers her new disciples and the world begins adjusting to a new social order, things ultimately become rather pleasant.

    "A ratty-faced Poelvoorde is excellent in the role, brilliantly capturing the exasperation of a man who is entirely to blame for his own misfortune." (Charles Gant, Screen Daily)

    "This new film from Belgian director Jaco van Dormael (Toto the Hero, Mr Nobody) won’t exactly win favour with the ultra-faithful, but for those who like their Bible stories with a thick coat of satire, The Brand New Testament is a peppy, original and (importantly) very sweet story." (Jordan Hoffman, The Guardian)

    "In these times of religious sensitivity, there is a sizeable risk that the premise will offend a certain swathe of the audience. In reality, the fantasy of a violent God storming around a dark apartment and mistreating his long-suffering wife and daughter is so stratospherically far out, it has the venom of a Monty Python routine. It is irresistibly laugh-out-loud and feel-good." (Deborah Young, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    The Dark Horse
    Sunday June 5, 8:00p–10:04p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Director James Napier's engrossing biopic is based on the inspirational true story of New Zealand chess legend Genesis Potini, a former speed-chess champion struggling with bipolar disorder who takes over as coach of a chess team for at-risk youth. We first meet Genesis Potini (Cliff Curtis) as he wanders down a street in Gisbourne, New Zealand, in the pouring rain. Muttering, eyes closed, his corpulent body draped in a multicoloured quilt, he could be taken for a mystic; in fact, he has just been released from the latest in a long line of psychiatric institutions.

    Genesis is trying to forge a new life after reconnecting with his brother Ariki (Wayne Hapi), who is immersed in gang life, and Ariki's adolescent son Mana (James Rolleston, Boy), who seems destined to wind up trapped in the same criminal milieu. When Genesis breaks away from the gang house and convinces the Eastern Knights, a chess club for at-risk youth, to take him on as a coach, he defies Ariki's wishes by bringing Mana along. What transpires is a battle—for Mana's future and well-being, for the dreams of the club's kids, and for Genesis's brilliant, fraught psyche.

    While this tough, exhilarating film is based on truth, its story possesses the archetypal power of myth. Giving the performance of his career, Curtis (barely recognizable from such films as The Fountain and Live Free or Die Hard) brilliantly articulates Genesis's Atlas-like strain, the terrible weight of a tortured mind pressing down upon his colossal frame. Though the real Potini died in 2011, The Dark Horse is a fitting tribute to his tumultuous yet triumphant story, encouraging all of us to think twice about what we are capable of accomplishing, regardless of our personal barriers.

    "The Dark Horse is an emotionally potent story of redemption anchored by a heart-piercing lead performance from Cliff Curtis." (Michael Rechtshaffen, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "It’s a film with the texture and truth of life, and at its heart is a beautiful performance by Cliff Curtis, who never in a million years will be nominated for an Oscar, but deserves one." (Cath Clarke, Time Out London)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Sing Street
    Sunday June 12, 8:00p–9:45p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Irish writer-director John Carney refreshed and revitalized the film musical with the Oscar-winning Once and his follow-up Begin Again. With his new film Sing Street, Carney takes us to 1980s Dublin for a semi-autobio¬graphical tale about a teenager who turns to music to escape his chaotic home life—and, naturally, to impress a girl.

    Forced to start over at a rough public school when his parents pull him from pri¬vate school due to their financial struggles, 14-year-old Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) becomes enamoured of the beautiful and mysterious Raphina (Lucy Boynton). Eager to make an impression, Conor invites Raphina to star in his band’s music video—despite the fact that he has not yet formed a band, or even written any music. With the guidance of his drop-out older brother, Conor restyles himself as “Cosmo,” recruits some enthusiastic but musically untrained schoolmates, and sets out to make a band from scratch by studying and emulating the New Wave stars of the era like A-ha, Duran Duran, and Spandau Ballet. Soon, the ragtag group is shooting music videos on a less-than-shoestring budget and looking to wow their fellow students at the upcoming school ball—and meanwhile, Cosmo starts making progress in his quest to win Raphina’s heart.

    Featuring a stellar soundtrack that mixes nostalgic hits and original music, Sing Street combines the scrappy energy of 2013 Film Circuit favourite We Are the Best! with the sweetness and charm of a coming-of-age love story. As with the director’s previous hits, Carney’s latest is sure to have audiences cheering and singing along once again.

    "Sing Street is a wholly appealing genesis of teenage romance and music-group therapy for one Irish boy and a instant retro classic for those still hungry like the wolf." (Brian Truitt, USA Today)

    "What makes Sing Street such a joyously entertaining film (besides the songs) is that it thinks the best of its characters, and it presents them the way they’d like to think of themselves." (Noel Murray, The Playlist)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • THEATRE
    Broken Leg Theatre - Fifth
    Saturday June 18, 7:00p–9:00p
    Presented by Donna Holmes
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Tickets: At the Door or by contacting Donna at iwakichick@hotmail.com.

    Help us celebrate BLT's FIFTH ANNIVERSARY!!

    Our June 19, 5th anniversary, show will feature Caravan Theatre, Edalene Theatre, The Dead Sheep Scrolls, Dianne Looker, El Mirlo Flamenco, Tir Na Nog, DanceConXion, and more!!

    Broken Leg Theatre is a theatrical variety show that includes drama, comedy, musical theatre, dance... or maybe even something by YOU!

    If you'd like to be involved (on, or behind, the stage) please contact Donna Holmes at iwakichick@hotmail.com or check out our Facebook page at https://facebook.com/brokenlegtheatre. :O)

    Contact: iwakichick@hotmail.com

  • CINEMA
    The Man Who Knew Infinity
    Sunday June 19, 8:00p–9:54p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Featuring terrific performances by Dev Patel (The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, Slumdog Millionaire) and Academy Award winner Jeremy Irons (Margin Call), The Man Who Knew Infinity tells the story of Srinivasa Ramanujan, the Indian mathematician whose contributions to number theory, continued fractions, and infinite series revolutionized the field. This sweeping historical film about high science and the tragic repercussions of racism amongst the ostensibly enlightened is a testament to the wonder and precariousness of genius—and the power of friendship to change the world.

    Opening near the dawn of the twentieth cen­tury, the film follows Ramanujan (Patel) from his humble roots in Madras—where oppor­tunities for someone of Ramanujan’s abilities are few—to Cambridge University, where the young prodigy's visionary theories attract the attention of English mathematician G.H. Hardy (Irons). The chance to work in the same hal­lowed halls where Isaac Newton formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation is a dream come true for Ramanujan, but also proves to be a sort of nightmare. His colleagues, unable to see beyond his dark skin and unfa­miliar culture, harass and humiliate him, while Hardy insists that Ramanujan deliver countless proofs before being allowed to publish his work.

    One of the most remarkable feats of The Man Who Knew Infinity is the way it renders Ramanujan's groundbreaking, complex theo­ries understandable even to a layperson. But even more important is the film’s depiction of Ramanujan and Hardy's difficult yet deep friendship, as they gradually evolve from stern mentor and untamable protégé to true peers, whose mutual love and respect transcend the formidable obstacles of race, class, culture, and tradition.

    "At first glance the tall, gangly Patel is an odd choice to play a short, stout mathematician. Yet he captures his essential passion, dignity, and overweening conviction that his formulas are right." (Deborah Young, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "This is the very definition of the kind of movie people complain that 'they' don’t make anymore: a modestly budgeted, character-driven drama for adults that doesn’t insult the viewer’s intelligence or lean on shock value." (Katie Rife, The A.V. Club)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    One Man Two Guvnors
    Saturday June 25, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20 - only at the door, cash or credit card (no debit)

    In 1960s Brighton, socially naive Francis Henshall becomes separately employed by two men – Roscoe Crabbe, a local gangster, and Stanley Stubbers, an upper class criminal. Francis tries to keep the two from meeting, in order to avoid each of them learning that Francis is also working for someone else.

    What happens next gets more and more complicated leading to utter chaos and side-splitting hilarity.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com

  • CINEMA
    The Meddler
    Sunday June 26, 8:00p–9:40p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Striking a winning balance of insight, heart, and laugh-out-loud hilarity, the second feature from Lorene Scafaria (Seeking a Friend for the End of the World) stars the magnificent Susan Sarandon (Robot & Frank, Emotional Arithmetic) in one of her richest roles yet. Foregrounding a character typically relegated to the comic-relief sidelines, The Meddler is about that force of nature known as the doting mother.

    For Marnie Minervini (Sarandon), motherhood is not a familial duty—it is a vocation. A compulsive advice-giver, the recently widowed but ceaselessly cheerful Marnie cannot stop texting, calling, and showing up unannounced (and with bagels in tow) at the home of her daughter Lori (Rose Byrne, TV’s Damages). Desperate to gain some control over her life following a messy breakup, Lori attempts to establish some boundaries with her mother, only to inadvertently unleash Marnie’s persistent meddling across the greater Los Angeles area. Whether out of habit or as an unconscious strategy to avoid dealing with her grief, Marnie cannot stop being a mom to everyone she meets, whether it is funding the wedding of one of Lori’s acquaintances or driving a young Apple Store clerk to college classes. But a chance encounter with a charismatic, chicken-raising rent-a-cop (J.K. Simmons, Whiplash) offers Marnie the opportunity to leave her supporting role behind and finally become the star of her own life.

    Scafaria’s whip-smart storytelling and observations on relationships, ethnic ties, and the nuances of sixty-something dating provide the film with a pervasive warmth and authenticity, while Sarandon’s exceptional talents are on full display in one of the veteran actor’s most memorable creations. Alternately maddening, lovable, and delightful, Marnie is both The Meddler’s emotional heart and its greatest triumph.

    "The Meddler serves as a lovely valentine not just to Scafaria’s mom, Gail, but to mothers everywhere—including the luminous Susan Sarandon in a role that seems to come naturally." (Peter Debruge, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050