2-Week Calendar

Printable Version

March 1 - 7

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

March 8 - 14

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

ALL UPCOMING EVENTS

  • CINEMA
    The Secret Trial 5
    Wednesday March 4, 7:00p–8:24p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    The Secret Trial 5

    Imagine spending years in prison without being charged with a crime or knowing exactly what you are accused of. A film about the human impact of the “War on Terror,” The Secret Trial 5 is a sobering examination of the Canadian government’s use of security certificates, a Kafkaesque tool that allows for indefinite detention without charges, based on evidence not revealed to the accused or their lawyers.

    Over the last decade, this rare and highly controversial device has been used to detain five men for nearly 30 years combined. To date, none has been charged with a crime or has seen the evidence against them. Through the experience of the detainees and their families, the film raises poignant questions about the balance between security and liberty.

    A true crowdfunding success story, The Secret Trial 5 was shot over four years on funds raised primarily through public contributions. Using their animated trailer, the filmmakers reached out to Canadians and raised nearly $50,000 through two campaigns before being selected as recipients of Telefilm Canada’s inaugural Micro-Budget Program.

    While travelling back and forth for shoots in Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa, first-time filmmakers Amar Wala and Noah Bingham stayed true to their grassroots, community-based approach to production by constantly sharing progress and staying connected with their supporters. Partnering with several human rights and legal organizations along the way, the team’s goal has always been to raise awareness and spur debate about security certificates at every stage of production.

    "Wala tackles a very complex subject, steeped in equal measures of secrecy and absurdity, and makes it comprehensible while giving the audience some sense of the toll it has taken on the men as well as their families. He also presents some useful context from a number of respected legal minds and human rights advocates. The utter silence from the other side—a host of government agencies—speaks volumes. As Canadians, we’re used to looking elsewhere in the world and shuddering at the lack of due process and respect for human rights. This film is bound to shake many of us out of that sense of smug complacency." (Peter Howell, TheStar.com)

    "If the doc seems biased, don’t blame the filmmakers. There wasn’t a single government representative who would talk to them." (Susan G. Cole, NowToronto)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • MUSIC
    Night Kitchen Fortuitous
    Saturday March 7, 8:00p–10:00p
    Presented by The Dead Sheep Scrolls
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: Tickets $10 ($5 for students)

    Tickets: Just Us Cafe in Wolfville

    Here at Night Kitchen, we feel so incredibly lucky to be able to showcase so many great local performers, and so we bring you NIGHT KITCHEN FORTUITOUS, featuring Kate & Rich and Curtis Matheson, as well as a host of other phenomenal musicians. Come and share in our luck!

    Contact: nightkitchenwolfville@gmail.com

  • CINEMA
    Deux jours, une nuit
    Sunday March 8, 4:00p–5:35p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Deux jours, une nuit

    In the new film from master filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (Rust and Bone, The Kid with a Bike), a working class Belgian mother (Marion Cotillard, The Immigrant, Rust and Bone) loses her job but has a fighting chance—and one weekend—to get it back.

    Almost immediately after returning to her factory job following a mental health leave, Sandra (Cotillard) is laid off because her fellow workers voted to receive a bonus rather than keep her as the seventeenth person on the team. When she learns that their team leader persuaded them to vote against her under false pretenses, Sandra convinces the plant manager to hold a second, secret vote. It is now Friday afternoon, leaving Sandra only two days and one night to save her job and, quite possibly, the life her family knows. Swallowing her pride, Sandra sets out with her loving husband (Fabrizio Rongione, The Kid With a Bike, Rosetta) to convince her sixteen co-workers, one by one, to vote in her favour.

    Featuring cinematography by Dardennes regular Alain Marcoen, Deux jours, une nuit is executed in the duo’s signature naturalist style. The story’s events unfold in real time through long takes and hand-held shots, enveloping us in Sandra’s world and putting a human face on Europe’s economic crisis.

    Cotillard does brilliantly subtle work here as Sandra, always giving us a glimpse of what lies beneath. Despite the high stakes and mounting tension around Sandra’s situation, we are reminded that—whether it is enjoying an ice cream in the park, finding a killer song on the radio, or the simple act of listening to others—there is much that can be accomplished, and savoured, in two days and one night.

    "Even if you’ve skipped the Dardennes’ work until now, this is a talking-point movie—and an outstanding lead performance—you need to see. It’s a rare film of unforced simplicity that will stick with you for a long time. And it’s honest right to its perfectly judged ending." (Kim Newman, Empire)

    "A tense dramatic situation and a subtly magnificent central performance from Marion Cotillard add up to an outstanding new movie from the Dardenne brothers." (Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Deux jours, une nuit
    Sunday March 8, 7:00p–8:35p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Deux jours, une nuit

    In the new film from master filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (Rust and Bone, The Kid with a Bike), a working class Belgian mother (Marion Cotillard, The Immigrant, Rust and Bone) loses her job but has a fighting chance—and one weekend—to get it back.

    Almost immediately after returning to her factory job following a mental health leave, Sandra (Cotillard) is laid off because her fellow workers voted to receive a bonus rather than keep her as the seventeenth person on the team. When she learns that their team leader persuaded them to vote against her under false pretenses, Sandra convinces the plant manager to hold a second, secret vote. It is now Friday afternoon, leaving Sandra only two days and one night to save her job and, quite possibly, the life her family knows. Swallowing her pride, Sandra sets out with her loving husband (Fabrizio Rongione, The Kid With a Bike, Rosetta) to convince her sixteen co-workers, one by one, to vote in her favour.

    Featuring cinematography by Dardennes regular Alain Marcoen, Deux jours, une nuit is executed in the duo’s signature naturalist style. The story’s events unfold in real time through long takes and hand-held shots, enveloping us in Sandra’s world and putting a human face on Europe’s economic crisis.

    Cotillard does brilliantly subtle work here as Sandra, always giving us a glimpse of what lies beneath. Despite the high stakes and mounting tension around Sandra’s situation, we are reminded that—whether it is enjoying an ice cream in the park, finding a killer song on the radio, or the simple act of listening to others—there is much that can be accomplished, and savoured, in two days and one night.

    "Even if you’ve skipped the Dardennes’ work until now, this is a talking-point movie—and an outstanding lead performance—you need to see. It’s a rare film of unforced simplicity that will stick with you for a long time. And it’s honest right to its perfectly judged ending." (Kim Newman, Empire)

    "A tense dramatic situation and a subtly magnificent central performance from Marion Cotillard add up to an outstanding new movie from the Dardenne brothers." (Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Birdman
    Wednesday March 11, 7:00p–8:59p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton) was a star—no, a superstar—the scowling face of a superhero film franchise that audiences and studio suits loved equally once upon a time (albeit for very different reasons). He was at the top of his game—indeed, on the top of the world.

    But fame is a double-edged thing, and both edges can be sharp. Even 22 years after last donning the supersuit, Riggan still cannot seem to convince anyone he is capable of doing anything more than flex his muscles and growl his lines.

    That is when he gets an idea, one he hopes will make people see him with fresh eyes. He will put on a show—but not just any show. He will mount a New York stage adaptation of Raymond Carver's What We Talk About When We Talk About Love. Not only will he star, but he will direct the thing and even pen the adaptation himself. And then, if everything goes according to plan, people will finally see him as more than a washed-up, tights-wearing has-been.

    If everything goes according to plan. Which it won't.

    Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance from director Alejandro González Iñárritu (Biutiful, Babel)  is a black comedy that tells the story of an actor—famous for portraying an iconic superhero—as he struggles to mount a Broadway play. In the days leading up to opening night, he battles his ego and attempts to recover his family, his career, and himself.

    "Based on a sharp script co-written by Inarritu—and featuring a top-shelf cast highlighted by Michael Keaton in the lead role and Edward Norton as his loose-cannon antagonist/foil—Birdman is a movie that can be enjoyed equally for its entertaining peek at backstage life or for its poignant portrait of the fragility of an on-the-brink artist. In the process, Birdman offers sly, biting commentary on America's celebrity-obsessed culture. It eviscerates Hollywood's commoditization of big-screen brainlessness as well as the moviegoing masses who are all too happy to settle for it." (Mike Scott, The Times-Picayune)

    "This is a remarkable feat, not only of cinematography, but of choreography. Just to film Michael Keaton and Edward Norton walking down a Manhattan street, everything had to be timed as in a dance—when the camera swirls ahead, when it goes behind, when it swoops back around. It’s all accomplished so smoothly that it would be worth doing merely as a stunt, except this is no stunt. This method carries the mood and soul of one of the best movies of 2014." (Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    Behind the Beautiful Forevers
    Friday March 13, 7:00p–9:40p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: Available now at all Ticketpro outlets • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Box of Delights, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    India is surging with global ambition. But beyond the luxury hotels surrounding Mumbai airport lies a makeshift slum, full of people with plans of their own.

    Zehrunisa and her son Abdul aim to recycle enough rubbish to fund a proper house. Sunil, twelve and stunted, wants to eat until he’s as tall as Kalu the thief. Asha seeks to steal government anti-poverty funds to turn herself into a ‘first-class person’, while her daughter Manju intends to become the slum’s first female graduate.

    But their schemes are fragile; global recession threatens the garbage trade, and another slum-dweller is about to make an accusation that will destroy herself and shatter the neighbourhood.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com  |  902-697-4231

  • CINEMA
    The Imitation Game
    Sunday March 15, 4:00p–5:54p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In Norwegian director Morten Tyldum's (Headhunters) English-language debut, Benedict Cumberbatch (12 Years a Slave, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) stars as brilliant Cambridge mathematician, cryptanalyst and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing, who spearheaded the Enigma code-breaking operation during World War II and was later persecuted by the British government for his homosexuality.

    At Cambridge University, the young Turing quickly establishes himself as a groundbreaking thinker with his theories about the potential of computing machines. When war between Britain and Germany is declared, these theories are put into active practice. Turing easily passes a test to become a member of a top-secret group assigned to decode critical German naval communications. Much to the surprise of the commanding officers, so does a woman, Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley, Begin Again, Anna Karenina). Turing and Clarke become fast friends, and are soon engaged to be married. But Turing is gay, struggling with his identity at a time when it is illegal and subject to terrible punishment.

    Cumberbatch plays Turing as a mercurial character, unafraid of his quirks and brashly proud of his intellect. Knightley's Clarke is his equal—for all his insight into the workings of consciousness, she may understand him better than he does himself. The meeting of their minds does not result in a conventional love story, but The Imitation Game does chronicle a remarkable relationship while Turing and his colleagues race against time.

    "Dominating it all is Cumberbatch, whose charisma, tellingly modulated and naturalistic array of eccentricities, Sherlockian talent at indicating a mind never at rest and knack for simultaneously portraying physical oddness and attractiveness combine to create an entirely credible portrait of genius at work." (Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "A superb thriller and a worthy biopic of a real hero. It’s also simultaneously an encouraging follow-up for Headhunters’ Morten Tyldum, an impressive debut for screenwriter Graham Moore, and a big-screen career highlight for Benedict Cumberbatch." (Dan Jollin, Empire)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    The Imitation Game
    Sunday March 15, 7:00p–8:54p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In Norwegian director Morten Tyldum's (Headhunters) English-language debut, Benedict Cumberbatch (12 Years a Slave, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) stars as brilliant Cambridge mathematician, cryptanalyst and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing, who spearheaded the Enigma code-breaking operation during World War II and was later persecuted by the British government for his homosexuality.

    At Cambridge University, the young Turing quickly establishes himself as a groundbreaking thinker with his theories about the potential of computing machines. When war between Britain and Germany is declared, these theories are put into active practice. Turing easily passes a test to become a member of a top-secret group assigned to decode critical German naval communications. Much to the surprise of the commanding officers, so does a woman, Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley, Begin Again, Anna Karenina). Turing and Clarke become fast friends, and are soon engaged to be married. But Turing is gay, struggling with his identity at a time when it is illegal and subject to terrible punishment.

    Cumberbatch plays Turing as a mercurial character, unafraid of his quirks and brashly proud of his intellect. Knightley's Clarke is his equal—for all his insight into the workings of consciousness, she may understand him better than he does himself. The meeting of their minds does not result in a conventional love story, but The Imitation Game does chronicle a remarkable relationship while Turing and his colleagues race against time.

    "Dominating it all is Cumberbatch, whose charisma, tellingly modulated and naturalistic array of eccentricities, Sherlockian talent at indicating a mind never at rest and knack for simultaneously portraying physical oddness and attractiveness combine to create an entirely credible portrait of genius at work." (Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "A superb thriller and a worthy biopic of a real hero. It’s also simultaneously an encouraging follow-up for Headhunters’ Morten Tyldum, an impressive debut for screenwriter Graham Moore, and a big-screen career highlight for Benedict Cumberbatch." (Dan Jollin, Empire)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Red Army
    Wednesday March 18, 7:00p–8:16p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Red Army

    A smash hit at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival, director Gabe Polsky’s exhilarating documentary chronicles the rise and fall of Soviet hockey in the 1980s.

    During the Cold War, battles between East and West played out in sports as much as international politics, as Stalin and his successors saw their athletes as ambassadors of ideology. Red Army reveals one of the most colourful chapters of this history, focusing on the Soviet hockey team and its rivalries with Canada and the USA.

    At the centre of the story is Slava Fetisov, one of the greatest players to experience the highs and lows of Soviet hockey prior to the USSR’s collapse. He stood up to a powerful system and paved the way for Russian players to change their circumstances. As Soviet communism gave way to global capitalism, the lure of NHL money unraveled the legendary team known as the Red Army, which had been famed for a graceful style of play that emphasized co-operation and teamwork. When its players entered the NHL, they had to grapple with a more individualistic style, along with Red Scare–fuelled prejudice.

    You do not need to be a hockey fan to get swept up in this story of friendship and divided loyalties. In his feature documentary debut, Polsky draws poignant interviews from key figures of the era, including Fetisov, his teammates, and NHL coach Scotty Bowman.

    Highlighting the dramatic stories on and off the ice, the director documents an interchange across the historical East-West divide that shows we still have a lot to learn about each other. Reopening this history makes for one of the most widely appealing documentaries of the year.

    "There are times when sport isn't a metaphor—it's simply war, a skirmish of ideals... the longest battle of them all: the Soviet Union's rival-crushing Cold War hockey team, which between 1978 and 1992 won three Olympic golds and eight World Championships. On and off the ice, the Russians triggered such panic that Ronald Reagan pleaded with the American team to win for the sake of global politics. 'They're a microcosm of their society,' Reagan insisted of the Soviet team, and if they triumphed, so did communism. If we won, of course, so did everything decent in the world. Gabe Polsky's fascinating and funny documentary opens with Reagan's bellicose speech, and tracks how both countries fought their PR wars on the rink. Red Army is a riveting look behind the Iron Curtain." (Amy Nicholson, The Village Voice)

    "Good sports movies are always about more than sports... Red Army touches on themes of friendship and perseverance, and also offers a compact and vivid summary of recent Russian history." (A.O. Scott, The New York Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    The Skeleton Twins
    Sunday March 22, 4:00p–5:33p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    The Skeleton Twins

    As children, Maggie and Milo Dean seemed inseparable. But tragedy hit their family as teenagers when their father died, sending them on different paths, and ultimately leading to a decade-long estrangement. Now in their thirties, another set of near-tragedies brings them together. Melancholic Milo (Bill Hader), a frustrated actor with no prospects, decides to accept his sister’s offer to return to their hometown in bucolic upstate New York. However, he is unaware that Maggie (Kristen Wiig) herself is barely holding it together, secretly unhappy despite her loving husband Lance (Luke Wilson).

    At first, the bond between the twins is tentative: A surprise visit from their mother (Joanna Gleason), a new-age practitioner who refuses to recognize her children’s pain, only seems to amplify just how little Maggie and Milo have recovered from the events of their childhood. Secretly Maggie and Milo separately seek out relationships that are destined to go nowhere. Maggie enjoys the flirtatious attention of her hunky Australian SCUBA instructor (Boyd Holbrook) a little too much, sabotaging her interest in having a baby with Lance.

    Meanwhile, Milo meets up with his first love, Rich (Ty Burrell). After their father’s death, Milo (as an older teenager) had an affair with Rich, his high-school English teacher—a scandal that drove brother and sister apart. At first, Rich is seemingly happy with a girlfriend and grown son and resents Milo’s sudden return. Desperate to get his former lover’s attention, Milo pretends to be successful and happy, which is enough to get Rich to consider rekindling their romance.

    With painful wounds that only the other can understand, Milo and Maggie grow closer as they try to guide each other through this newest set of secrets. But as the hurt from the past catches up to the confusion in the present, their special bond is put to the test once again. They bring out not only the best in each other, but also the worst, and they are each desperate to avoid owning their own mistakes. Eventually Milo and Maggie grow to understand that living truthfully and sharing their lives with each other, pain and all, is the only way they can move forward and reclaim the happiness they once enjoyed together.

    Deftly weaving humor and sweetness in with the pathos, director Craig Johnson and Mark Heyman's screenplay won the coveted Waldo Salt screenwriting award at the Sundance Film Festival in January.

    "It is what Hader and Wiig do with the words that makes this one of the better movies to come along this year. The pair, who specialized in over-the-top nonsense on SNL, till the terrifying terrain of adults who lost their father to suicide when they were young with such eloquent grace that it speaks volumes about the depth of their talent." (Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times)

    "It's hard to say if Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader give wonderful comic performances with a tragic dimension in The Skeleton Twins, or wonderful dramatic performances with a comic dimension. What's easy to say is the key word wonderful, which applies equally to the film... This is only the second feature for the director but Mr. Johnson's work with his actors is impeccable, and his style is freewheeling. Far from an insight retreat, The Skeleton Twins is an insight delight." (Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    The Skeleton Twins
    Sunday March 22, 7:00p–8:33p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    The Skeleton Twins

    As children, Maggie and Milo Dean seemed inseparable. But tragedy hit their family as teenagers when their father died, sending them on different paths, and ultimately leading to a decade-long estrangement. Now in their thirties, another set of near-tragedies brings them together. Melancholic Milo (Bill Hader), a frustrated actor with no prospects, decides to accept his sister’s offer to return to their hometown in bucolic upstate New York. However, he is unaware that Maggie (Kristen Wiig) herself is barely holding it together, secretly unhappy despite her loving husband Lance (Luke Wilson).

    At first, the bond between the twins is tentative: A surprise visit from their mother (Joanna Gleason), a new-age practitioner who refuses to recognize her children’s pain, only seems to amplify just how little Maggie and Milo have recovered from the events of their childhood. Secretly Maggie and Milo separately seek out relationships that are destined to go nowhere. Maggie enjoys the flirtatious attention of her hunky Australian SCUBA instructor (Boyd Holbrook) a little too much, sabotaging her interest in having a baby with Lance.

    Meanwhile, Milo meets up with his first love, Rich (Ty Burrell). After their father’s death, Milo (as an older teenager) had an affair with Rich, his high-school English teacher—a scandal that drove brother and sister apart. At first, Rich is seemingly happy with a girlfriend and grown son and resents Milo’s sudden return. Desperate to get his former lover’s attention, Milo pretends to be successful and happy, which is enough to get Rich to consider rekindling their romance.

    With painful wounds that only the other can understand, Milo and Maggie grow closer as they try to guide each other through this newest set of secrets. But as the hurt from the past catches up to the confusion in the present, their special bond is put to the test once again. They bring out not only the best in each other, but also the worst, and they are each desperate to avoid owning their own mistakes. Eventually Milo and Maggie grow to understand that living truthfully and sharing their lives with each other, pain and all, is the only way they can move forward and reclaim the happiness they once enjoyed together.

    Deftly weaving humor and sweetness in with the pathos, director Craig Johnson and Mark Heyman's screenplay won the coveted Waldo Salt screenwriting award at the Sundance Film Festival in January.

    "It is what Hader and Wiig do with the words that makes this one of the better movies to come along this year. The pair, who specialized in over-the-top nonsense on SNL, till the terrifying terrain of adults who lost their father to suicide when they were young with such eloquent grace that it speaks volumes about the depth of their talent." (Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times)

    "It's hard to say if Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader give wonderful comic performances with a tragic dimension in The Skeleton Twins, or wonderful dramatic performances with a comic dimension. What's easy to say is the key word wonderful, which applies equally to the film... This is only the second feature for the director but Mr. Johnson's work with his actors is impeccable, and his style is freewheeling. Far from an insight retreat, The Skeleton Twins is an insight delight." (Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Kis uykusu (Winter Sleep)
    Wednesday March 25, 7:00p–10:16p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Kis uykusu (Winter Sleep)

    Winner of the Palme d’Or at last year’s Cannes, the new film from Turkish auteur Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Once Upon a Time in Anatolia) is an immersive, meditative chamber drama about a small-town innkeeper whose cultural pretensions and smug self-satisfaction are fatefully undermined over the course of an eventful winter.

    Set in the picturesque and striking landscape of Cappadocia in Central Anatolia, Winter Sleep focuses on a small village, half-empty, in the wintry off-season. In its three-hour-plus running time it follows a kind of local celebrity, Aydin (Haluk Bilginer, Rosewater), an actor who runs a small hotel with his wife Nihal (Melisa Sözen), writes a column for the local newspaper, and is toying with the idea of producing a book on Turkish theatre.

    Like all the villagers, Aydin has time on his hands, but as Ceylan's film progresses, the director carefully strips away the veneer that surrounds this self-satisfied and insular man. Through some magnificent set pieces, beautifully written and performed, we get a close look at Aydin's interactions with his wife, his recently divorced sister Necla (Demet Akbag), and a family of locals who are tenants of one of his properties.

    With a steady, penetrating gaze reminiscent of that which Ingmar Bergman brought to his chamber pieces, Ceylan cuts through the smug self-image of a man who considers himself above the quotidian but is ultimately brought face-to-face with who and what he truly is. Controlled and spare while using its length to its advantage, Winter Sleep is compelling, hypnotic, and absolutely deadly in its aim.

    Nuri Bilge Ceylan has gained a reputation as one of the most innovative and accomplished filmmakers of the early twenty-first century. Winter Sleep is a magnificent addition to his growing filmography.

    "Following Ceylan’s sublime 2011 drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, this equally assured but considerably more accessible character study tunnels into the everyday existence of a middle-aged former actor turned comfortably situated hotel owner—and emerges with a multifaceted study of human frailty whose moral implications resonate far beyond its remote Turkish setting. Simultaneously vast and intimate, sprawling and incisive, and talky in the best possible sense, Winter Sleep is a richly engrossing and ravishingly beautiful magnum opus that surely qualifies as the least boring 196-minute movie ever made." (Justin Chang, Variety)

    "This story, with its weary evening conversations, creaky and outdated hierarchies, familial discord, inherited pain and a longing for the city and high culture, owes an enormous debt to Chekhov (he’s thanked at the end). However, at its heart is something to which Ceylan keeps returning in films: a portrait of a restless, difficult man who feels out of time and place, and whose behaviour does him no favours... That said, when the film gets outdoors, it soars, and Ceylan continues to dig with acute intelligence into the dark corners of everyday human behaviour." (Dave Calhoun, Time Out London)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • MUSIC
    Hupman Brothers and Ian Sherwood Show
    Saturday March 28, 8:00p
    Presented by The Hupman Brothers
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: The Rolled Oat Cafe, 420 Main Street, Wolfville

    This will be an acoustic trio show with The Hupman Brothers and Ian Sherwood. They will share the stage collaborating and sharing each other's songs. Ian Sherwood is nominated for two ECMA's this year for Solo recording of the year and Folk recording of the year. The Hupman Brothers are also nominated for Best Blues Recording for Black River Blues which they recorded with their band.
    You can call to reserve at 542-9884 or email hupmanbrothers@hotmail.com to reserve a ticket.

    Contact: hupmanbrothers@hotmail.com  |  542-9884

  • CINEMA
    Gemma Bovery
    Sunday March 29, 4:00p–5:39p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Gemma Bovery

    For the source of her latest film, director Anne Fontaine (Coco Before Chanel) has turned to graphic novelist Posy Simmonds, whose update of Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd provided Stephen Frears with the story for 2010’s Tamara Drewe. This time, Gustave Flaubert’s classic novel of romantic yearning, Madame Bovary, is the basis for another imaginative recasting of a timeless masterpiece.

    Embracing the melancholy of Flaubert’s book while placing it against the bucolic wonders of the verdant Norman landscape, Gemma Bovery orbits around its young, married protagonist, in this telling an Englishwoman (Gemma Arterton, Tamara Drewe) who moves to a small French village with her husband (Jason Flemyng). Another recent arrival is Martin Joubert (Fabrice Luchini, Cycling with Molière, Potiche), a baker who has fled Paris, along with his long-suffering wife, in search of stability and equilibrium. Martin rapidly takes a proprietary interest in the English beauty and falls under the spell of her charm. Gemma’s passionate nature is ill-served by her husband, and it is not long before her eye starts to wander.

    Fontaine’s film is not just an incisive look at a young woman confronting a series of key choices in her life as she loses her head in a fit of passion: in her clever revision of the Flaubert original, she portrays Joubert as a man completely aware of the narrative of Madame Bovary, and who makes awkward and self-conscious interventions in an attempt to change that story. Luchini is perfect as the wary, lovelorn baker, while Arterton—who also starred as the title character in Frears’ film—fits the role of her namesake to perfection. As both the object and subject of love, she glides into her role with effortless aplomb.

    "The time period and spelling may be different, but Gustave Flaubert’s most famous creation is very much alive in Gemma Bovery, a breezy postmodern update of the classic novel that replaces the book’s darker passages for tongue-in-cheek laughs and plenty of eye candy." (Jordan Mintzer, The Hollywood Repor

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Gemma Bovery
    Sunday March 29, 7:00p–8:39p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Gemma Bovery

    For the source of her latest film, director Anne Fontaine (Coco Before Chanel) has turned to graphic novelist Posy Simmonds, whose update of Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd provided Stephen Frears with the story for 2010’s Tamara Drewe. This time, Gustave Flaubert’s classic novel of romantic yearning, Madame Bovary, is the basis for another imaginative recasting of a timeless masterpiece.

    Embracing the melancholy of Flaubert’s book while placing it against the bucolic wonders of the verdant Norman landscape, Gemma Bovery orbits around its young, married protagonist, in this telling an Englishwoman (Gemma Arterton, Tamara Drewe) who moves to a small French village with her husband (Jason Flemyng). Another recent arrival is Martin Joubert (Fabrice Luchini, Cycling with Molière, Potiche), a baker who has fled Paris, along with his long-suffering wife, in search of stability and equilibrium. Martin rapidly takes a proprietary interest in the English beauty and falls under the spell of her charm. Gemma’s passionate nature is ill-served by her husband, and it is not long before her eye starts to wander.

    Fontaine’s film is not just an incisive look at a young woman confronting a series of key choices in her life as she loses her head in a fit of passion: in her clever revision of the Flaubert original, she portrays Joubert as a man completely aware of the narrative of Madame Bovary, and who makes awkward and self-conscious interventions in an attempt to change that story. Luchini is perfect as the wary, lovelorn baker, while Arterton—who also starred as the title character in Frears’ film—fits the role of her namesake to perfection. As both the object and subject of love, she glides into her role with effortless aplomb.

    "The time period and spelling may be different, but Gustave Flaubert’s most famous creation is very much alive in Gemma Bovery, a breezy postmodern update of the classic novel that replaces the book’s darker passages for tongue-in-cheek laughs and plenty of eye candy." (Jordan Mintzer, The Hollywood Repor

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Boychoir
    Sunday April 5, 7:00p–8:43p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    From acclaimed Canadian director François Girard (Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould, The Red Violin) comes a drama that the entire family can enjoy: the story of a gifted eleven-year-old boy who must struggle against the odds to find his voice.

    Stet (newcomer Garrett Wareing) is an angry youngster who can sing like an angel. Orphaned after his mother is killed in a car accident, he ends up boarding at a choir school on the US East Coast—a place about as different from his small Texas town as can be. Feeling misunderstood, out of place, and

    frustrated with the cards life has dealt him, Stet finds himself at odds with Choirmaster Carvelle (Dustin Hoffman, Chef, Barney’s Version), a disciplinarian of the old school. But Carvelle recognizes something special in Stet’s voice, and pushes the boy to put his troubled young soul into the music.

    Boychoir will have audiences swooning as voices converge in hymns, and cracking a smile when a joyous rap breaks out in the school washroom. Supported by a star-studded cast that includes Josh Lucas (Daydream Nation), Eddie Izzard (Across the Universe), Debra Winger (Rachel Getting Married), and Kathy Bates (Midnight in Paris), Wareing makes a marvellous debut as a kid who has been through hell but has been granted a heavenly gift.

    Boychoir is about the way that music can touch our lives—if only it is given enough encouragement to come out and play.

    "In a country where musical talent is so often confused with sex appeal, Boychoir offers a welcome alternative, celebrating discipline, talent and the sound of untainted innocence." (Peter Debruge, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Boychoir
    Monday April 6, 7:00p–8:43p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    From acclaimed Canadian director François Girard (Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould, The Red Violin) comes a drama that the entire family can enjoy: the story of a gifted eleven-year-old boy who must struggle against the odds to find his voice.

    Stet (newcomer Garrett Wareing) is an angry youngster who can sing like an angel. Orphaned after his mother is killed in a car accident, he ends up boarding at a choir school on the US East Coast—a place about as different from his small Texas town as can be. Feeling misunderstood, out of place, and

    frustrated with the cards life has dealt him, Stet finds himself at odds with Choirmaster Carvelle (Dustin Hoffman, Chef, Barney’s Version), a disciplinarian of the old school. But Carvelle recognizes something special in Stet’s voice, and pushes the boy to put his troubled young soul into the music.

    Boychoir will have audiences swooning as voices converge in hymns, and cracking a smile when a joyous rap breaks out in the school washroom. Supported by a star-studded cast that includes Josh Lucas (Daydream Nation), Eddie Izzard (Across the Universe), Debra Winger (Rachel Getting Married), and Kathy Bates (Midnight in Paris), Wareing makes a marvellous debut as a kid who has been through hell but has been granted a heavenly gift.

    Boychoir is about the way that music can touch our lives—if only it is given enough encouragement to come out and play.

    "In a country where musical talent is so often confused with sex appeal, Boychoir offers a welcome alternative, celebrating discipline, talent and the sound of untainted innocence." (Peter Debruge, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Selma
    Sunday April 12, 4:00p–6:08p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    On the afternoon of March 7, 1965, Alabama state troopers and members of a Dallas County posse, armed with clubs, cattle prods and tear gas, attacked civil rights demonstrators on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The marchers had planned to walk the 50 miles to Montgomery, the state capital, as part of a long-building protest against the denial of basic voting rights to Southern blacks. The procession would have crossed Lowndes County, where not a single African-American voter had been registered in more than 60 years. Efforts to change this had been met with bureaucratic obstruction, intimidation and lethal brutality, including the killing, a week earlier, of Jimmie Lee Jackson, a 26-year-old laborer and protester, by a state trooper.

    A few days later, a second march, led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., turned back rather than risk further violence. By the time the third, ultimately successful effort left Selma on March 21, President Lyndon B. Johnson, pushed by Dr. King and televised images of official brutality as well as by his own political and moral instincts, had introduced the Voting Rights Act in a nationally televised address to Congress.

    Selma is the story of a movement. The film chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition. The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement.  Director Ava DuVernay (Middle of Nowhere) tells the real story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo, Lincoln, The Help) and his brothers and sisters in the movement prompted change that forever altered history. Up for two Oscars, the film has already garnered 32 awards and 70 nominations.

    "Ms. DuVernay, writes history with passionate clarity and blazing conviction. (The cinematographer, Bradford Young, captures its shadows and its glow.) Even if you think you know what’s coming, Selma hums with suspense and surprise. Packed with incident and overflowing with fascinating characters, it is a triumph of efficient, emphatic cinematic storytelling. And much more than that. Selma is not a manifesto, a battle cry or a history lesson. It’s a movie: warm, smart, generous and moving in two senses of the word. It will call forth tears of grief, anger, gratitude and hope. And like those pilgrims on the road to Montgomery, it does not rest." (A.O. Scott, The New York Times)

    "Known for her superb indie dramas, DuVernay has proven herself a master of small, intimate moments. Selma never loses focus on the interpersonal dynamics between King and his followers, his detractors and his family." (Odie Henderson, RogerEbert.com)

    "There are several reasons to see Selma—for its virtuosity and scale, scope and sheer beauty. But then there are its lessons, which have to do with history, but also today: Selma invites viewers to heed its story, meditate on its implications and allow those images once again to change our hearts and minds." (Ann Hornaday, Washington Post)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Selma
    Sunday April 12, 7:00p–9:08p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    On the afternoon of March 7, 1965, Alabama state troopers and members of a Dallas County posse, armed with clubs, cattle prods and tear gas, attacked civil rights demonstrators on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The marchers had planned to walk the 50 miles to Montgomery, the state capital, as part of a long-building protest against the denial of basic voting rights to Southern blacks. The procession would have crossed Lowndes County, where not a single African-American voter had been registered in more than 60 years. Efforts to change this had been met with bureaucratic obstruction, intimidation and lethal brutality, including the killing, a week earlier, of Jimmie Lee Jackson, a 26-year-old laborer and protester, by a state trooper.

    A few days later, a second march, led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., turned back rather than risk further violence. By the time the third, ultimately successful effort left Selma on March 21, President Lyndon B. Johnson, pushed by Dr. King and televised images of official brutality as well as by his own political and moral instincts, had introduced the Voting Rights Act in a nationally televised address to Congress.

    Selma is the story of a movement. The film chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition. The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement.  Director Ava DuVernay (Middle of Nowhere) tells the real story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo, Lincoln, The Help) and his brothers and sisters in the movement prompted change that forever altered history. Up for two Oscars, the film has already garnered 32 awards and 70 nominations.

    "Ms. DuVernay, writes history with passionate clarity and blazing conviction. (The cinematographer, Bradford Young, captures its shadows and its glow.) Even if you think you know what’s coming, Selma hums with suspense and surprise. Packed with incident and overflowing with fascinating characters, it is a triumph of efficient, emphatic cinematic storytelling. And much more than that. Selma is not a manifesto, a battle cry or a history lesson. It’s a movie: warm, smart, generous and moving in two senses of the word. It will call forth tears of grief, anger, gratitude and hope. And like those pilgrims on the road to Montgomery, it does not rest." (A.O. Scott, The New York Times)

    "Known for her superb indie dramas, DuVernay has proven herself a master of small, intimate moments. Selma never loses focus on the interpersonal dynamics between King and his followers, his detractors and his family." (Odie Henderson, RogerEbert.com)

    "There are several reasons to see Selma—for its virtuosity and scale, scope and sheer beauty. But then there are its lessons, which have to do with history, but also today: Selma invites viewers to heed its story, meditate on its implications and allow those images once again to change our hearts and minds." (Ann Hornaday, Washington Post)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    The Hard Problem
    Friday April 17, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Box of Delights, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    By Tom Stoppard.
    The story centres around a young psychology researcher at odds with her colleagues at a brainscience institute.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com  |  902-542-7474, x 230

  • CINEMA
    Wild
    Sunday April 19, 4:00p–5:55p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Devastated by the death of her mother from cancer in 1991, the twenty-two-year-old Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon, Mud, Walk the Line) soon spirals into a deeply self-destructive decline that destroys her marriage and leaves her addicted to heroin. Four years later, in a bid to leave her demons behind, she makes a rash decision and embarks on a life-changing journey. Haunted by memories of her mother Bobbi (Laura Dern, The Master) and with absolutely no experience, she sets out to hike more than a thousand miles on the Pacific Crest Trail all on her own.

    Based on Strayed's best-selling memoir Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club, Café de flore, The Young Victoria) and screenwriter Nick Hornby (An Education) bring her extraordinary adventure to the screen. Wild tells the story of her journey, alternating remarkable moments from the novice hiker's unaccompanied trek with flashbacks of the traumas that triggered her inspiring feat. The film powerfully reveals her terrors and pleasures—as she forges ahead on a journey that maddens, strengthens, and ultimately heals her.

    Vallée, who is rapidly becoming one of Hollywood's foremost filmmakers, relates these parallel narratives with a dexterous touch, balancing vivid depictions of Strayed's gruelling exertions with instances of heartfelt introspection. Hornby's screenplay, meanwhile, retains the compelling blend of humour and pathos that won Strayed's book such wide acclaim. This follow-up to Vallée's Oscar-winning Dallas Buyers Club is an extraordinary odyssey of loss and self-discovery, powered by Witherspoon's award-worthy characterization.

    "There are other movies out this year that are more technically ambitious than Wild (I'm thinking Birdman). There are others that are wider-reaching in scope and sheer audacity (the 12-years-in-the-making Boyhood). But there aren't any others that offer the power and profundity of Wild. This movie is a gift. It's also a journey." (Mike Scott, New Orleans Times-Picayune)

    "Wild may sound like a film about redemption, but it’s more about learning to live with what you can’t control—and accepting what you can control, which is sometimes just as difficult." (Connie Ogle, Miami Herald)

    "As for Witherspoon, there’s not a shred of her America’s Sweetheart persona in this work. She strips naked, literally and otherwise, in a raw, brave performance." (Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Wild
    Sunday April 19, 7:00p–8:55p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Devastated by the death of her mother from cancer in 1991, the twenty-two-year-old Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon, Mud, Walk the Line) soon spirals into a deeply self-destructive decline that destroys her marriage and leaves her addicted to heroin. Four years later, in a bid to leave her demons behind, she makes a rash decision and embarks on a life-changing journey. Haunted by memories of her mother Bobbi (Laura Dern, The Master) and with absolutely no experience, she sets out to hike more than a thousand miles on the Pacific Crest Trail all on her own.

    Based on Strayed's best-selling memoir Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club, Café de flore, The Young Victoria) and screenwriter Nick Hornby (An Education) bring her extraordinary adventure to the screen. Wild tells the story of her journey, alternating remarkable moments from the novice hiker's unaccompanied trek with flashbacks of the traumas that triggered her inspiring feat. The film powerfully reveals her terrors and pleasures—as she forges ahead on a journey that maddens, strengthens, and ultimately heals her.

    Vallée, who is rapidly becoming one of Hollywood's foremost filmmakers, relates these parallel narratives with a dexterous touch, balancing vivid depictions of Strayed's gruelling exertions with instances of heartfelt introspection. Hornby's screenplay, meanwhile, retains the compelling blend of humour and pathos that won Strayed's book such wide acclaim. This follow-up to Vallée's Oscar-winning Dallas Buyers Club is an extraordinary odyssey of loss and self-discovery, powered by Witherspoon's award-worthy characterization.

    "There are other movies out this year that are more technically ambitious than Wild (I'm thinking Birdman). There are others that are wider-reaching in scope and sheer audacity (the 12-years-in-the-making Boyhood). But there aren't any others that offer the power and profundity of Wild. This movie is a gift. It's also a journey." (Mike Scott, New Orleans Times-Picayune)

    "Wild may sound like a film about redemption, but it’s more about learning to live with what you can’t control—and accepting what you can control, which is sometimes just as difficult." (Connie Ogle, Miami Herald)

    "As for Witherspoon, there’s not a shred of her America’s Sweetheart persona in this work. She strips naked, literally and otherwise, in a raw, brave performance." (Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • MUSIC
    Andy and Ariana CD Release
    Friday April 24, 8:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Andy and Ariana
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Contact: ariana@tabmusic.ca

  • MUSIC
    Andy and Ariana CD Release
    Saturday April 25, 8:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Andy and Ariana
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: 20

    Contact: ariana@tabmusic.ca

  • THEATRE
    Man and Superman
    Friday May 15, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Box of Delights, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    by George Bernard Shaw
    With Ralph Fiennes
    A romantic comedy, an epic fairytale, a fiery philosophical debate.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com  |  902-542-7474, x 230

  • THEATRE
    A View from the Bridge
    Friday June 19, 7:00p–9:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: Available now at all Ticketpro outlets https://secure.ticketpro.ca/achat_AWT05IS14.html • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Box of Delights, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    In Brooklyn, longshoreman Eddie Carbone welcomes his Sicilian cousins to the land of freedom. But when one of them falls for his beautiful niece, they discover that freedom comes at a price. Eddie’s jealous mistrust exposes a deep, unspeakable secret – one that drives him to commit the ultimate betrayal. The visionary Ivo van Hove directs this stunning production of Miller’s tragic masterpiece.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com  |  902-697-4231