2-Week Calendar

Printable Version

August 30 - September 5

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

September 6 - 12

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

ALL UPCOMING EVENTS

  • MUSIC
    Night Kitchen Reinstated
    Saturday September 5, 8:00p–10:00p
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: Tickets $10 ($5 for students/unwaged)

    Tickets: Just Us Cafe in Wolfville

    It's almost September, which means the coming of fall, the start of school - and Night Kitchen is back, baby, with a great lineup to start the season off with a bang. Featuring the talents Laura Roy and Crash & Burn, plus the usual host of faces old and new. No better way to console yourself over the end of summer than by coming out and supporting local artists!

  • CINEMA
    I’ll See You in My Dreams
    Sunday September 6, 7:00p–8:32p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Premiering at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival, director Brett Haley's I’ll See You in My Dreams is a funny, touching, and romantic comedy-drama that follows a retired schoolteacher as she discovers new friendships, adventures and heartaches in her twilight years.

    A long-time widow and empty-nester, Carol Petersen (Blythe Danner, Sylvia, Meet the Parents) enjoys a pleasantly placid every¬day routine of playing bridge with friends, tending her garden, watching TV and relaxing with a glass of wine. But when her beloved dog becomes ill and has to be put down, Carol is confronted with the loneliness at the core of her seemingly comfortable and tranquil life. With the help of her best friends—played by the stellar trio of June Squibb (Nebraska), Rhea Perlman and Mary Kay Place—Carol decides to embrace the world, embarking on an unlikely friendship with her young pool maintenance man (Martin Starr), pursuing a new love interest (Sam Elliott, Grandma, Up in the Air), and reconnecting with her daughter (Malin Akerman, The Bang Bang Club).

    Taking advantage of a rare leading role, the marvelous Danner endows Carol with a lifetime’s worth of wisdom and experience, and her outstanding work is matched by the rest of the sterling supporting cast. Sensitive, nuanced and affectingly sincere, I’ll See You in My Dreams is a revelatory tale about love among the not-so-young.

    "Now after 43 years in feature films, Danner has gotten the opportunity to show what she can do, and in I’ll See You in My Dreams, she is simply jaw-dropping, just wonderful." (Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle)

    "Director Brett Haley (...) has managed to create a film about those final years that gets to the heart of things like loss and love without patronizing or parody. No small thing to create a movie whose cast is mostly in their 70s yet whose story is so relatable whatever your age." (Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    I’ll See You in My Dreams
    Monday September 7, 7:00p–8:32p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Premiering at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival, director Brett Haley's I’ll See You in My Dreams is a funny, touching, and romantic comedy-drama that follows a retired schoolteacher as she discovers new friendships, adventures and heartaches in her twilight years.

    A long-time widow and empty-nester, Carol Petersen (Blythe Danner, Sylvia, Meet the Parents) enjoys a pleasantly placid every¬day routine of playing bridge with friends, tending her garden, watching TV and relaxing with a glass of wine. But when her beloved dog becomes ill and has to be put down, Carol is confronted with the loneliness at the core of her seemingly comfortable and tranquil life. With the help of her best friends—played by the stellar trio of June Squibb (Nebraska), Rhea Perlman and Mary Kay Place—Carol decides to embrace the world, embarking on an unlikely friendship with her young pool maintenance man (Martin Starr), pursuing a new love interest (Sam Elliott, Grandma, Up in the Air), and reconnecting with her daughter (Malin Akerman, The Bang Bang Club).

    Taking advantage of a rare leading role, the marvelous Danner endows Carol with a lifetime’s worth of wisdom and experience, and her outstanding work is matched by the rest of the sterling supporting cast. Sensitive, nuanced and affectingly sincere, I’ll See You in My Dreams is a revelatory tale about love among the not-so-young.

    "Now after 43 years in feature films, Danner has gotten the opportunity to show what she can do, and in I’ll See You in My Dreams, she is simply jaw-dropping, just wonderful." (Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle)

    "Director Brett Haley (...) has managed to create a film about those final years that gets to the heart of things like loss and love without patronizing or parody. No small thing to create a movie whose cast is mostly in their 70s yet whose story is so relatable whatever your age." (Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Everyday Rebellion
    Wednesday September 9, 7:00p–8:52p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Conceived and directed by the Riahi brothers, Everyday Rebellion is an impressionistic documentary essay as well as a web platform about non-violent forms of protest and civil disobedience in the 21st century. A project about methods of resistance supported by technology, seen not only through the current movements of the Arabian and Iranian uprisings, but also through former successful and less successful revolts. The film describes the everyday conscious and subconscious of resistance of societies fighting suppression and repression.

    "What does the Occupy movement in New York have in common with the Spanish Indignados protests or the Arab Spring? Is there a connection between the struggle of the Iranian democracy movement and the nonviolent uprising in Syria and what is the link between the Ukrainian topless activists of Femen and an Islamic culture like Egypt? And to top it off, what do Serbia and Turkey have to do with all this?

    The reasons for the various people’s uprisings in these countries may be diverse, but the creative nonviolent tactics they use in their struggles are strongly connected to each other. So are the activists who share these strategies, new ideas and established methods. Everyday Rebellion is a story about the richness of peaceful protest, acted out every day by passionate people from Spain, Iran, Syria, Ukraine, USA, UK and Serbia. These methods are inventive, funny and sometimes even aggressive. And the activists who use them believe that creative nonviolent protest will win over violent protest— and they are right. Nonviolence has scientifically been proven to be more effective and successful than violent protest. And the users of nonviolence are feared because they are rapidly changing the world and challenging dictatorships as well as global corporations.

    Everyday Rebellion is a tribute to the creativity of the nonviolent resistance. The project studies the consequences of a modern and rapidly changing society where new forms of protest to challenge the power of dictatorships and sometimes also global corporations are invented every day. Everyday Rebellion wants to give voice to all those who decide not to use violence to try changing a violent system. Because, as Ghandi said: 'First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win'." (http://www.everydayrebellion.net/the-project/)

    "A striking documentary that shows that non-violent forms of protest and civil disobedience can change the world, Everyday Rebellion is made with languid grace and insight by directors and brothers Arash and Arman Riahi, and it gently underscores how violence isn’t the only answer." (Mark Adams, Screen Daily)

    "As this intelligent film proves it is the smaller, more personal stance that may ultimately make the bigger difference." (Damon Wise, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Wednesday September 9, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Wolfville Theatre Collective
    Studio-Z
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15

    Tickets: Tan Coffee, Wolfville and at the door

    Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a modern American classic - and the first script to be presented by a new theatre group, The Wolfville Theatre Collective. It’s a portrait of a marriage and an examination of truth and illusion - a heady cocktail. The production marks Mike Butler’s directorial debut and stars Thea Burton, Paul Abela, Mike Dennis and Nicole Saulnier. Come join the fun and games!

    Contact: butlermike50@gmail.com  |  902-542-1907

  • THEATRE
    Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Thursday September 10, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Wolfville Theatre Collective
    Studio-Z
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15

    Tickets: Tan Coffee, Wolfville and at the door

    Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a modern American classic - and the first script to be presented by a new theatre group, The Wolfville Theatre Collective. It’s a portrait of a marriage and an examination of truth and illusion - a heady cocktail. The production marks Mike Butler’s directorial debut and stars Thea Burton, Paul Abela, Mike Dennis and Nicole Saulnier. Come join the fun and games!

    Contact: butlermike50@gmail.com  |  902-542-1907

  • THEATRE
    Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Friday September 11, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Wolfville Theatre Collective
    Studio-Z
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15

    Tickets: Tan Coffee, Wolfville and at the door

    Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a modern American classic - and the first script to be presented by a new theatre group, The Wolfville Theatre Collective. It’s a portrait of a marriage and an examination of truth and illusion - a heady cocktail. The production marks Mike Butler’s directorial debut and stars Thea Burton, Paul Abela, Mike Dennis and Nicole Saulnier. Come join the fun and games!

    Contact: butlermike50@gmail.com  |  902-542-1907

  • CINEMA
    Infinitely Polar Bear
    Sunday September 13, 4:00p–5:30p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A loving husband and father struggling with manic depression (Mark Ruffalo, Begin Again, The Kids Are All Right ) is forced to raise his two young daughters on his own, in this moving and inspirational drama based on writer-director Maya Forbes' own childhood experiences. This lovingly detailed, bittersweet debut careens between laughter and anxiety as it invites us into a singular family's chaotic home.

    Raising a family is not easy for anyone, but the Stuarts are a little more challenged than your average parents. Cameron Stuart (Ruffalo) has suffered a nervous breakdown and been diagnosed with manic depression, a highly stigmatized label that, in 1978 Boston, renders him virtually unemployable. Maggie Stuart (Zoe Saldana) works hard but cannot quite make ends meet. They are highly educated and completely broke. They also have two precocious young daughters to care for.

    A solution presents itself, but with it come unnerving risks: Maggie accepts a scholarship to pursue her business degree in New York, which means leaving Faith and Amelia in Boston—and solely in the hands of their father. Infinitely Polar Bear chronicles the eighteen-month period in which the aggressively gregarious, always unpredictable Cameron struggles to cope with his condition and become a viable single parent to the little girls he so clearly loves.

    Humour and heartbreak alike are on offer as we witness Cameron stumble in his attempts to be a good neighbour and engaged father while attending to his wildly varying moods and impulses. For every misstep, there is evidence of Cameron's fierce love, and Ruffalo performs the remarkable feat of keeping his character utterly sympathetic even in his darkest, most irresponsible moments. We can see plenty of problems and peril in the Stuart family, but, if we look closer, we can also see their wondrous gifts.

    "The movie is a small miracle, lifted by Ruffalo and these two remarkable young actresses. Refusing to soften the edges when Cam is off his meds, Ruffalo is a powerhouse. He and Forbes craft an indelibly intimate portrait of what makes a family when the roles of parent and child are reversed." (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone)

    "Written with wit and nuance and sensitively directed by Maya Forbes, who makes a formidable feature-film debut, this is a movie that informs and entertains, with a centerpiece performance by the great, often underrated and always surprising Mark Ruffalo." (Rex Reed, New York Observer)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Infinitely Polar Bear
    Sunday September 13, 7:00p–8:30p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A loving husband and father struggling with manic depression (Mark Ruffalo, Begin Again, The Kids Are All Right ) is forced to raise his two young daughters on his own, in this moving and inspirational drama based on writer-director Maya Forbes' own childhood experiences. This lovingly detailed, bittersweet debut careens between laughter and anxiety as it invites us into a singular family's chaotic home.

    Raising a family is not easy for anyone, but the Stuarts are a little more challenged than your average parents. Cameron Stuart (Ruffalo) has suffered a nervous breakdown and been diagnosed with manic depression, a highly stigmatized label that, in 1978 Boston, renders him virtually unemployable. Maggie Stuart (Zoe Saldana) works hard but cannot quite make ends meet. They are highly educated and completely broke. They also have two precocious young daughters to care for.

    A solution presents itself, but with it come unnerving risks: Maggie accepts a scholarship to pursue her business degree in New York, which means leaving Faith and Amelia in Boston—and solely in the hands of their father. Infinitely Polar Bear chronicles the eighteen-month period in which the aggressively gregarious, always unpredictable Cameron struggles to cope with his condition and become a viable single parent to the little girls he so clearly loves.

    Humour and heartbreak alike are on offer as we witness Cameron stumble in his attempts to be a good neighbour and engaged father while attending to his wildly varying moods and impulses. For every misstep, there is evidence of Cameron's fierce love, and Ruffalo performs the remarkable feat of keeping his character utterly sympathetic even in his darkest, most irresponsible moments. We can see plenty of problems and peril in the Stuart family, but, if we look closer, we can also see their wondrous gifts.

    "The movie is a small miracle, lifted by Ruffalo and these two remarkable young actresses. Refusing to soften the edges when Cam is off his meds, Ruffalo is a powerhouse. He and Forbes craft an indelibly intimate portrait of what makes a family when the roles of parent and child are reversed." (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone)

    "Written with wit and nuance and sensitively directed by Maya Forbes, who makes a formidable feature-film debut, this is a movie that informs and entertains, with a centerpiece performance by the great, often underrated and always surprising Mark Ruffalo." (Rex Reed, New York Observer)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • MUSIC
    Ben Caplan & The Casual Smokers
    Wednesday September 16, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Ben Caplan & The Casual Smokers
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15 advance, $20 at the door

    Tickets: TBD

    Buy Tickets Online

    Album Release and North American Tour Kick Off

  • MUSIC
    Ben Caplan & The Casual Smokers
    Thursday September 17, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Ben Caplan & The Casual Smokers
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15 advance, $20 at the door

    Tickets: TBD

    Buy Tickets Online

    Album Release and North American Tour Kick Off

    Contact: heather@bencaplan.ca

  • THEATRE
    Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Friday September 18, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Wolfville Theatre Collective
    Studio-Z
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15

    Tickets: Tan Coffee, Wolfville and at the door

    Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a modern American classic - and the first script to be presented by a new theatre group, The Wolfville Theatre Collective. It’s a portrait of a marriage and an examination of truth and illusion - a heady cocktail. The production marks Mike Butler’s directorial debut and stars Thea Burton, Paul Abela, Mike Dennis and Nicole Saulnier. Come join the fun and games!

    Contact: butlermike50@gmail.com  |  902-542-1907

  • THEATRE
    Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Saturday September 19, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Wolfville Theatre Collective
    Studio-Z
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15

    Tickets: Tan Coffee, Wolfville and at the door

    Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a modern American classic - and the first script to be presented by a new theatre group, The Wolfville Theatre Collective. It’s a portrait of a marriage and an examination of truth and illusion - a heady cocktail. The production marks Mike Butler’s directorial debut and stars Thea Burton, Paul Abela, Mike Dennis and Nicole Saulnier. Come join the fun and games!

    Contact: butlermike50@gmail.com  |  902-542-1907

  • CINEMA
    The Grump
    Sunday September 20, 4:00p–5:45p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Based on Finnish author Tuomas Kyrö's popular novel, Dome Karukoski's The Grump juxtaposes the rural values of yesterday's Finland with the country's contemporary urban reality, with alternately hilarious and touching results. The eponymous, unnamed hero (played by legendary Finnish actor Antti Litja) is a stubbornly traditional eighty-year-old farmer who, following a domestic accident, must come to Helsinki and stay with his youngest son, an unemployed New Age sad sack, and his Type A businesswoman daughter-in-law.

    From the outset, the new houseguest is hell on wheels. His social attitudes are, at best, prehistoric: he is terrified of change and is generally averse to displaying any emotions save rage and frustration; he freaks out when he is served by a young black woman at a coffee shop; and he is flummoxed by his daughter-in-law's lavender-scented bathroom. (Lavender, he insists, was used to poison soldiers in the trenches.) Nevertheless, his generosity, dogged independence, and slow-food work ethic contrast vividly, and favourably, with the trendy attitudes and self-absorbed behaviour of those around him—and despite his gruff manner, it soon becomes apparent that the Grump is harbouring painful secrets that he is loath to address.

    While this scenario could easily lend itself to Archie Bunker/Norman Lear-style bromides, Karukoski deftly sidesteps this potential pitfall by making his hero both unbearable and sympathetic, satirizing his prejudices and narrow-mindedness while lauding his honesty and validating his frustration with and resistance to modern times. In adapting a book many thought could not be brought to the screen, Karukoski has created an up-to-the-minute piece of social satire and further established himself as one of today's most versatile and inventive filmmakers.

    "This comic romp boasts the sort of humor that can be appreciated by anyone who thinks the world is going to hell in a handbasket... a touching story about tolerance and closing the generation gap." (Alissa Simon, Variety)

    "Audiences who savoured the comic odyssey of The One Hundred Year Old Man are equally likely to embrace the journey of another elderly rascal in The Grump (Mielensapahoittaja), a sweetly sentimental adaptation of the bestselling Tuomas Kyro novel. The comedy is often broad but the emotional upheavals become increasingly heartfelt in what ultimately emerges as a poignant exploration of loneliness, old age and the pitfalls and pleasures of remaining resolutely stuck in your ways." (Allan Hunter, Screen Daily)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    The Grump
    Sunday September 20, 7:00p–8:45p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Based on Finnish author Tuomas Kyrö's popular novel, Dome Karukoski's The Grump juxtaposes the rural values of yesterday's Finland with the country's contemporary urban reality, with alternately hilarious and touching results. The eponymous, unnamed hero (played by legendary Finnish actor Antti Litja) is a stubbornly traditional eighty-year-old farmer who, following a domestic accident, must come to Helsinki and stay with his youngest son, an unemployed New Age sad sack, and his Type A businesswoman daughter-in-law.

    From the outset, the new houseguest is hell on wheels. His social attitudes are, at best, prehistoric: he is terrified of change and is generally averse to displaying any emotions save rage and frustration; he freaks out when he is served by a young black woman at a coffee shop; and he is flummoxed by his daughter-in-law's lavender-scented bathroom. (Lavender, he insists, was used to poison soldiers in the trenches.) Nevertheless, his generosity, dogged independence, and slow-food work ethic contrast vividly, and favourably, with the trendy attitudes and self-absorbed behaviour of those around him—and despite his gruff manner, it soon becomes apparent that the Grump is harbouring painful secrets that he is loath to address.

    While this scenario could easily lend itself to Archie Bunker/Norman Lear-style bromides, Karukoski deftly sidesteps this potential pitfall by making his hero both unbearable and sympathetic, satirizing his prejudices and narrow-mindedness while lauding his honesty and validating his frustration with and resistance to modern times. In adapting a book many thought could not be brought to the screen, Karukoski has created an up-to-the-minute piece of social satire and further established himself as one of today's most versatile and inventive filmmakers.

    "This comic romp boasts the sort of humor that can be appreciated by anyone who thinks the world is going to hell in a handbasket... a touching story about tolerance and closing the generation gap." (Alissa Simon, Variety)

    "Audiences who savoured the comic odyssey of The One Hundred Year Old Man are equally likely to embrace the journey of another elderly rascal in The Grump (Mielensapahoittaja), a sweetly sentimental adaptation of the bestselling Tuomas Kyro novel. The comedy is often broad but the emotional upheavals become increasingly heartfelt in what ultimately emerges as a poignant exploration of loneliness, old age and the pitfalls and pleasures of remaining resolutely stuck in your ways." (Allan Hunter, Screen Daily)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Amy
    Wednesday September 23, 7:00p–9:08p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    From BAFTA award-winning director Asif Kapadia (Senna), Amy tells the incredible story of six-time Grammy-winner Amy Winehouse—in her own words. Featuring extensive unseen archive footage and previously unheard tracks, this strikingly modern, moving and vital film shines a light on the world we live in, in a way that very few can.

    A once-in-a-generation talent, Amy Winehouse was a musician that captured the world’s attention. A pure jazz artist in the most authentic sense—she wrote and sung from the heart using her musical gifts to analyse her own problems. The combination of her raw honesty and supreme talent resulted in some of the most unique and adored songs of the modern era.

    Her huge success, however, resulted in relentless and invasive media attention which coupled with Amy’s troubled relationships and precarious lifestyle saw her life tragically begin to unravel. Amy Winehouse died from alcohol poisoning in July 2011 at the age of 27.

    "[A] sensitive, superbly constructed, ultimately shattering documentary." (Ann Hornaday, Washington Post)

    "Amy Winehouse’s story is a tragic one—as with Kurt Cobain, who also died at 27, her potential as a singer and songwriter was only just beginning to be realized. Yet the prevailing mood of this documentary is joy. Kapadia captures what was irreplaceable about this unique performer, and in the process gives her the opportunity to do what she was made to do, the only thing she ever really wanted: to sing." (Dana Stevens, Slate)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    The Beaux' Stratagem
    Friday September 25, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: Available now at all Ticketpro outlets • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Cochrane's Pharmasave, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    Simon Godwin directs George Farquhar's wild comedy of love and cash. The ‘Beaux’: Mr Aimwell and Mr Archer, two charming, dissolute young men, have blown their fortunes in giddy London. Shamed and debt-ridden, they flee to provincial Lichfield. Their ‘Stratagem’: to marry for money.

    Lodged at the local inn, they encounter a teeming variety of human obstacles, but their greatest obstacle is love. When the Beaux meet their match in Dorinda and Mrs Sullen they are most at risk, for in love they might be truly discovered.

    Watch Video

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com

  • MUSIC
    Deep Roots
    Saturday September 26, 10:00a–4:30p
    Presented by Deep Roots Music Cooperative
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: 4 Day Pass: Adult - $115, Student - $95 or 3 Day Pass: Adult - $95, Student - $69
    This Show Only Tickets: Adult - $20.00 Student $15.00. This ticket includes Saturday Afternoon shows at Wolfville Farmers' Market, Festival Theatre & Al Whittle Theatre.

    Tickets: www.ticketpro.ca Valley Ticketpro Locations: Pharmasaves in Berwick, Kentville and Wolfville. Windsor Home Hardware

    Buy Tickets Online

    10:00am - Music Camp Concert: Featuring Ida Red, Old Man Luedecke and Music Camp participants.
    12:30pm - Songs and Poems from Home: Durham County Poets, Quique Escamilla.
    2:00pm - Songwriters’ Circle: Ian Janes, Dan MacCormack, The Worry Birds, Shannon Quinn.
    3:30pm - Let the Good News Ring!: Kimberly Matheson, The Hupman Brothers, Donna Holmes, Andy & Ariana.

    Contact: office@deeprootsmusic.ca  |  (902) 542-7668

  • CINEMA
    Mr. Holmes
    Sunday September 27, 4:00p–5:44p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In 1947, the long-retired Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen), aged 93, returns from a journey to Japan, where, in search of a rare plant with powerful restorative qualities, he has witnessed the devastation of nuclear warfare. Now, in his remote seaside farmhouse, Holmes faces the end of his days tending to his bees, with only the company of his housekeeper, Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney, Hyde Park on Hudson, The Savages), and her young son, Roger (Milo Parker).

    Grappling with the diminishing powers of his mind, Holmes comes to rely upon the boy as he revisits the circumstances of the unsolved case that forced him into retirement—a case involving an aggrieved husband, Thomas Kelmot (Patrick Kennedy, The Last Station, Atonement), his estranged wife Ann (Hattie Morahan, The Bank Job), and a strange musical instrument, a glass armonica, with possible occult powers, but, above all, a case in which Holmes got something wrong—and searches for answers to the mysteries of life and love—before it is too late.

    Adapted from Mitch Cullin's 2005 novel, A Slight Trick of the Mind, Mr. Holmes is a new twist on the world's most famous detective, in which he must detangle latent hang-ups regarding an unsolved case from his younger years at 221B Baker Street. Seventeen years after the movie that put him on the directing map and won him a screenwriting Oscar, Gods and Monsters, Bill Condon (Dreamgirls) is reunited with that film’s redoubtable star, Ian McKellen, in a pleasing variation on shared themes of aging and mortality. McKellen takes to the role with effortless gravitas and emotional versatility.

    "McKellen is brilliant throughout, his piercing blue eyes revealing the gallantry of youth and the sadness of a life’s worth of memories slipping further away. His understated and charming approach to the role makes it all the more potent and engaging." (Miriam Di Nunzio, Chicago Sun-Times)

    "Maneuvering shrewdly within the boundaries of the traditional canon and aided by the impeccable performance of Ian McKellen, Bill Condon directs an elegant puzzler that presents the sage of Baker Street dealing with the one thing he's never had to contend with before: his own emotions." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Mr. Holmes
    Sunday September 27, 7:00p–8:44p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In 1947, the long-retired Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen), aged 93, returns from a journey to Japan, where, in search of a rare plant with powerful restorative qualities, he has witnessed the devastation of nuclear warfare. Now, in his remote seaside farmhouse, Holmes faces the end of his days tending to his bees, with only the company of his housekeeper, Mrs. Munro (Laura Linney, Hyde Park on Hudson, The Savages), and her young son, Roger (Milo Parker).

    Grappling with the diminishing powers of his mind, Holmes comes to rely upon the boy as he revisits the circumstances of the unsolved case that forced him into retirement—a case involving an aggrieved husband, Thomas Kelmot (Patrick Kennedy, The Last Station, Atonement), his estranged wife Ann (Hattie Morahan, The Bank Job), and a strange musical instrument, a glass armonica, with possible occult powers, but, above all, a case in which Holmes got something wrong—and searches for answers to the mysteries of life and love—before it is too late.

    Adapted from Mitch Cullin's 2005 novel, A Slight Trick of the Mind, Mr. Holmes is a new twist on the world's most famous detective, in which he must detangle latent hang-ups regarding an unsolved case from his younger years at 221B Baker Street. Seventeen years after the movie that put him on the directing map and won him a screenwriting Oscar, Gods and Monsters, Bill Condon (Dreamgirls) is reunited with that film’s redoubtable star, Ian McKellen, in a pleasing variation on shared themes of aging and mortality. McKellen takes to the role with effortless gravitas and emotional versatility.

    "McKellen is brilliant throughout, his piercing blue eyes revealing the gallantry of youth and the sadness of a life’s worth of memories slipping further away. His understated and charming approach to the role makes it all the more potent and engaging." (Miriam Di Nunzio, Chicago Sun-Times)

    "Maneuvering shrewdly within the boundaries of the traditional canon and aided by the impeccable performance of Ian McKellen, Bill Condon directs an elegant puzzler that presents the sage of Baker Street dealing with the one thing he's never had to contend with before: his own emotions." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Ex Machina
    Wednesday September 30, 7:00p–8:48p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Alex Garland, writer of 28 Days Later and Sunshine, makes his directorial debut with the stylish and cerebral thriller, Ex Machina.

    Caleb Smith (Domhnall Gleeson, Calvary, Anna Karenina), a programmer at an internet-search giant, wins a competition to spend a week at the private mountain estate of the company's brilliant and reclusive CEO, Nathan Bateman (Oscar Isaac, Inside Llewyn Davis).

    Upon his arrival, Caleb learns that Nathan has chosen him to be the human component in a Turing Test—charging him with evaluating the capabilities, and ultimately the consciousness, of Nathan's latest experiment in artificial intelligence.

    That experiment is Ava (Alicia Vikander, Testament of Youth, Anna Karenina, A Royal Affair), a breathtaking A.I. whose emotional intelligence proves more sophisticated—and more deceptive—than the two men could have imagined.

    "Shrewdly imagined and persuasively made, Ex Machina is a spooky piece of speculative fiction that's completely plausible, capable of both thinking big thoughts and providing pulp thrills. But even saying that doesn't do this quietly unnerving film full justice." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    "It plays like Frankenstein meets Blade Runner via Hitchcock haunted by the ghosts of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations, in a film that’s both highly literate and steeped in tense cat-and-mouse chills. Thematically epic—it demands to be seen at least twice and should fuel hours of debate—structurally it’s as lithe as Ava’s perfect mesh frame." (Rosie Fletcher, Total Film)

    "To dismiss Ex Machina as just another robot movie would be like calling the Grand Canyon a hole in the ground. It's one of the most original, smart, thought-provoking science fiction movies of recent years." (Marc Mohan, Portland Oregonian)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • MUSIC
    A Northern Tapestry
    Friday October 2, 8:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Whistling Fish Productions
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $24 Adult $16 Student/Senior

    Tickets: Box of Delights Bookshop 466 Main St., Wolfville, NS

    Buy Tickets Online

    A multi-media show celebrating the beauty and breadth of the Canadian landscape, featuring songs and music by Geoff Noble, quotations from iconic poets, writers and artists, presented by Susan Shillingford, accompanied by over 400 stunning art and photographic images exploring Canada's natural landscape. A "must-see" which has been described as a timeless musical journey with a "glimpse into Canada's soul."

    Contact: sgsn@shaw.ca  |  (902)542-9511

  • CINEMA
    Jimmy’s Hall
    Sunday October 4, 4:00p–5:49p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Recounting the incredible true story of activist Jimmy Gralton, the new film from revered British director Ken Loach (The Angels’ Share, The Wind That Shakes the Barley) creates a stirring drama from a tumultuous yet little-known chapter of Irish history.

    Upon returning to his Irish hometown of Effrinagh from America in the early 1930s to care for his ailing mother, Gralton (Barry Ward) reopens a community dance hall that he had founded before the war. Jimmy’s Hall quickly becomes popular with local youth as a place to gather, dance to jazz, and host community events and debates. But, fearful that the hall is serving as a breeding ground for permissiveness, Americanization, and political radicalism—especially after Gralton joins the Revolutionary Workers’ Group, the forerunner of the Irish Communist Party—the local church attempts to shut it down. This only serves to stoke the fires of discontent among the local populace, bringing the church leadership into conflict with both the working class and changing mores. As Gralton becomes an ever greater thorn in the side of conservative authority (which includes not only the Catholic Church, but the former revolutionaries of Sinn Féin and the IRA), the forces of repression are driven to an extreme, unprecedented—and shameful—measure to quash this burgeoning movement of grassroots progressivism.

    Anchored by strong, naturalistic performances and buoyed by the exciting music of the time, the rousing Jimmy’s Hall is on a smaller scale than the war epic of The Wind That Shakes the Barley, but proudly carries on the tradition of committed political and social filmmaking for which Loach is rightfully renowned.

    "Lovely [and] heartfelt … infused with a gentle romanticism that buoys the film without cheapening the gravity of its subject. A minor-key but eminently enjoyable work by a master craftsman." (Scott Foundas, Variety)

    "Don’t let the politics scare you off, for Jimmy’s Hall is a joyous movie... Loach’s film isn’t technically a musical, but it has that same spirit, that same let’s-put-on-a-show vitality." (Bilge Ebiri, New York Magazine)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Jimmy’s Hall
    Sunday October 4, 7:00p–8:49p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Recounting the incredible true story of activist Jimmy Gralton, the new film from revered British director Ken Loach (The Angels’ Share, The Wind That Shakes the Barley) creates a stirring drama from a tumultuous yet little-known chapter of Irish history.

    Upon returning to his Irish hometown of Effrinagh from America in the early 1930s to care for his ailing mother, Gralton (Barry Ward) reopens a community dance hall that he had founded before the war. Jimmy’s Hall quickly becomes popular with local youth as a place to gather, dance to jazz, and host community events and debates. But, fearful that the hall is serving as a breeding ground for permissiveness, Americanization, and political radicalism—especially after Gralton joins the Revolutionary Workers’ Group, the forerunner of the Irish Communist Party—the local church attempts to shut it down. This only serves to stoke the fires of discontent among the local populace, bringing the church leadership into conflict with both the working class and changing mores. As Gralton becomes an ever greater thorn in the side of conservative authority (which includes not only the Catholic Church, but the former revolutionaries of Sinn Féin and the IRA), the forces of repression are driven to an extreme, unprecedented—and shameful—measure to quash this burgeoning movement of grassroots progressivism.

    Anchored by strong, naturalistic performances and buoyed by the exciting music of the time, the rousing Jimmy’s Hall is on a smaller scale than the war epic of The Wind That Shakes the Barley, but proudly carries on the tradition of committed political and social filmmaking for which Loach is rightfully renowned.

    "Lovely [and] heartfelt … infused with a gentle romanticism that buoys the film without cheapening the gravity of its subject. A minor-key but eminently enjoyable work by a master craftsman." (Scott Foundas, Variety)

    "Don’t let the politics scare you off, for Jimmy’s Hall is a joyous movie... Loach’s film isn’t technically a musical, but it has that same spirit, that same let’s-put-on-a-show vitality." (Bilge Ebiri, New York Magazine)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Far from the Madding Crowd
    Sunday October 11, 7:00p–8:59p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Based on the literary classic by Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd is the story of independent, beautiful and headstrong Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan, Inside Llewyn Davis, An Education), who attracts three very different suitors: Gabriel Oak (Matthias Schoenaerts, Rust and Bone), a sheep farmer, captivated by her fetching willfulness; Frank Troy (Tom Sturridge, Pirate Radio), a handsome and reckless Sergeant; and William Boldwood (Michael Sheen, Midnight in Paris, The Damned United), a prosperous and mature bachelor. This timeless story of Bathsheba's choices and passions explores the nature of relationships and love—as well as the human ability to overcome hardships through resilience and perseverance.

    Far from the Madding Crowd is the first mainstream English-language film from Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, a charter member of Lars von Trier’s Dogme movement who is best known for The Celebration (1998) and The Hunt (2012). The sublime production—particularly the gorgeous cinematography, deft editing and beautiful musical score—transports the viewer into the English countryside. With its artfully composed scenes, the film has a painterly quality.

    "Carey Mulligan is magnificent as the courageous, uncertain heroine in a ravishing new adaptation of Hardy's novel... [Vinterberg] has accomplished something that is both extremely simple and extremely difficult: This is a gorgeous literary adaptation true to its period and its source material in almost every respect, largely shot in the 'Hardy country' along the south coast of England. It’s also a film that feels charged with life and hunger and romantic-erotic energy." (Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com)

    "Director Thomas Vinterberg’s romantic rollercoaster honors Hardy’s rustic vibe. Remarkably, too, he’s made a thoroughly modern film anyone can relate to—it’s like a 'what a woman wants' discussion set in Victorian times. It’s also an instant classic." (Graham Fuller, New York Daily News)

    "Handsomely mounted, this is a period drama in which both unspoken demands and stated appetites drive the emotions that simmer below the surface from the first frame... few movies are delivered with this much craft and care." (Kevin Jagernauth, The Playlist)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Far from the Madding Crowd
    Monday October 12, 7:00p–8:59p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Based on the literary classic by Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd is the story of independent, beautiful and headstrong Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan, Inside Llewyn Davis, An Education), who attracts three very different suitors: Gabriel Oak (Matthias Schoenaerts, Rust and Bone), a sheep farmer, captivated by her fetching willfulness; Frank Troy (Tom Sturridge, Pirate Radio), a handsome and reckless Sergeant; and William Boldwood (Michael Sheen, Midnight in Paris, The Damned United), a prosperous and mature bachelor. This timeless story of Bathsheba's choices and passions explores the nature of relationships and love—as well as the human ability to overcome hardships through resilience and perseverance.

    Far from the Madding Crowd is the first mainstream English-language film from Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, a charter member of Lars von Trier’s Dogme movement who is best known for The Celebration (1998) and The Hunt (2012). The sublime production—particularly the gorgeous cinematography, deft editing and beautiful musical score—transports the viewer into the English countryside. With its artfully composed scenes, the film has a painterly quality.

    "Carey Mulligan is magnificent as the courageous, uncertain heroine in a ravishing new adaptation of Hardy's novel... [Vinterberg] has accomplished something that is both extremely simple and extremely difficult: This is a gorgeous literary adaptation true to its period and its source material in almost every respect, largely shot in the 'Hardy country' along the south coast of England. It’s also a film that feels charged with life and hunger and romantic-erotic energy." (Andrew O'Hehir, Salon.com)

    "Director Thomas Vinterberg’s romantic rollercoaster honors Hardy’s rustic vibe. Remarkably, too, he’s made a thoroughly modern film anyone can relate to—it’s like a 'what a woman wants' discussion set in Victorian times. It’s also an instant classic." (Graham Fuller, New York Daily News)

    "Handsomely mounted, this is a period drama in which both unspoken demands and stated appetites drive the emotions that simmer below the surface from the first frame... few movies are delivered with this much craft and care." (Kevin Jagernauth, The Playlist)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Timbuktu
    Wednesday October 14, 7:00p–8:37p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Set during the early days of the 2012 fundamentalist takeover of northern Mali, the new film from the great African director Abderrahmane Sissako (Bamako)—nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 87th Annual Academy Awards—is a powerful drama about the everyday woes and resistance of ordinary people in a city overrun by extremist foreign fighters.

    Under Timbuktu’s new fundamentalist rulers, music, laughter, and sports (even soccer) have been prohibited, women have been forced to cover their heads on pain of death, and kangaroo courts have
    been established that hand down horrendous punishments for even the slightest and most absurd of infractions. Kidane (Ibrahim Ahmed), a proud, independent herder who lives on the edge of the city
    with his wife, daughter and adopted son, has so far been unaffected by the city’s harsh new regime. But when, during a row over the slaughter of his prize cow, he accidentally kills a fisherman, he witnesses
    and experiences firsthand the nightmarish perversion of “justice” practiced by the city’s ruthless occupiers.

    Inspired by real people and events, Timbuktu accomplishes what only the greatest of art can: from the atrocities of war and oppression, it distills something luminous, lyrical and poetic. Featuring stunning cinematography by Sofiane el-Fani, consummate editing by Nadia Ben Rachid, and outstanding performances from its ensemble cast, Timbuktu movingly attests to the human will to resist the terrors and injustices of absolutism.

    "At a time when thugs are running rampant under the dubious banner of Islamic pietism and when Westerners nervously wonder where the next threat is coming from, Timbuktu returns the focus to those parts of the world where citizens—most of them Muslims—suffer indignity, violence, repression and death not as an abstract worst case but as daily life. Set in the titular city in Mali, this breathtaking, heartbreaking, humbly miraculous movie accomplishes precisely what cinema does at its best: take viewers into a world not their own, invite them to explore it in ways more compassionate than didactic, and leave them feeling perhaps better informed but certainly more connected to people whose aspirations, joys and anxieties aren’t so different from their own. With its spectacular sand-swept landscape, lush textures, beguiling music and indomitable, unforgettable protagonists, Timbuktu makes an effective case for both a culture and natural world under relentless attack. In providing audiences a chance to bear witness to unspeakable suffering as well as dazzling defiance and human dignity, Sissako has created a film that’s a privilege to watch." (Ann Hornaday, Washington Post)

    "A thoroughly remarkable and disquieting film from Mali’s Abderrahamane Sissako, Timbuktu is also a work of almost breathtaking visual beauty, but it manages to ravish the heart while dazzling the eye simultaneously, neither at the expense of the other. It’s a work of art that seems realized in an entirely organic way." (Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    Broken Leg Theatre - Orange
    Saturday October 17, 7:00p–9:00p
    Presented by Donna Holmes
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: All Tickets - $10 available at the door (or by contacting Donna at iwakichick@hotmail.com)

    Tickets: by emailing Donna at iwakichick@hotmail.com

    Broken Leg Theatre is a theatrical variety show full of comedy, music, drama, and dance!

    October's theme this year is 'orange'. Orange you glad?  :O) 

    This is a family friendly show and because of that we're going to start at SEVEN (7pm) this time around (instead of 8). Check out our Facebook page for more details closer to the date. Tell all your friends and see you for the fun!

    Contact: iwakichick@hotmail.com

  • CINEMA
    Love & Mercy
    Sunday October 18, 4:00p–6:01p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Love & Mercy presents an unconventional portrait of Brian Wilson, the mercurial singer, songwriter and leader of The Beach Boys. Set against the era-defining catalog of Wilson’s music, the film intimately examines the personal voyage and ultimate salvation of the icon whose success came at extraordinary personal cost.

    This powerful and intimate film by Bill Pohlad, a veteran movie producer (including 12 Years a Slave) and co-written by Michael Alan Lerner and Oren Moverman (I'm Not There), tries to evade the typical pitfalls of the rock ‘n’ roll biography by focusing on two turning points in Wilson’s life, separated by 20 years or more: The creation of his quasi-symphonic masterwork Pet Sounds in the mid-1960s, along with his subsequent mental breakdown, and his disastrous, dependent relationship with a manipulative therapist named Eugene Landy (Paul Giamatti, Barney's Version, The Last Station) in the 1980s.

    Wilson is played by Paul Dano (12 Years a Slave, Little Miss Sunshine) as a young man, and then by John Cusack as a middle-aged wreck struggling to reclaim himself with the help of girlfriend, and future wife, Melinda Ledbetter (Elizabeth Banks). The two characters—they do not exactly seem like the same person—and the two drastically different periods of Wilson’s life and American cultural history weave in and out of each other in a devilishly complicated tapestry.

    "Love & Mercy captures with striking immediacy the unbound power of the artist in his element." (Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle)

    "A wonderfully innervating cure for the common musical biopic, Bill Pohlad’s Love & Mercy vibrantly illuminates two major breakthroughs—one artistic, one personal—in the life of the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson." (Andrew Barker, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Love & Mercy
    Sunday October 18, 7:00p–9:01p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Love & Mercy presents an unconventional portrait of Brian Wilson, the mercurial singer, songwriter and leader of The Beach Boys. Set against the era-defining catalog of Wilson’s music, the film intimately examines the personal voyage and ultimate salvation of the icon whose success came at extraordinary personal cost.

    This powerful and intimate film by Bill Pohlad, a veteran movie producer (including 12 Years a Slave) and co-written by Michael Alan Lerner and Oren Moverman (I'm Not There), tries to evade the typical pitfalls of the rock ‘n’ roll biography by focusing on two turning points in Wilson’s life, separated by 20 years or more: The creation of his quasi-symphonic masterwork Pet Sounds in the mid-1960s, along with his subsequent mental breakdown, and his disastrous, dependent relationship with a manipulative therapist named Eugene Landy (Paul Giamatti, Barney's Version, The Last Station) in the 1980s.

    Wilson is played by Paul Dano (12 Years a Slave, Little Miss Sunshine) as a young man, and then by John Cusack as a middle-aged wreck struggling to reclaim himself with the help of girlfriend, and future wife, Melinda Ledbetter (Elizabeth Banks). The two characters—they do not exactly seem like the same person—and the two drastically different periods of Wilson’s life and American cultural history weave in and out of each other in a devilishly complicated tapestry.

    "Love & Mercy captures with striking immediacy the unbound power of the artist in his element." (Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle)

    "A wonderfully innervating cure for the common musical biopic, Bill Pohlad’s Love & Mercy vibrantly illuminates two major breakthroughs—one artistic, one personal—in the life of the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson." (Andrew Barker, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World
    Wednesday October 21, 7:00p–8:14p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    At a stunning low altitude, aerial cinematography sweeps over the Haida Gwaii, a breathtakingly beautiful archipelago off the British Columbia Northwest Coast. It takes us into the geographic heart of the Haida Gwaiian people, who thrived for more than 10,000 years until they were decimated through disease, rampant commercial logging and industrial over-fishing since contact. Today, the Haida Nation is recovering, exerting their sovereignty and winning battles against unsustainable logging and fishing.

    Award-winning director Charles Wilkinson (Oil Sands Karaoke, Peace Out) turns his camera on the unique community uniting to protect land and sea for the next generation. Haida hereditary Chief Allan Wilson, renowned activist Guujaaw and non-indigenous eco-activist Severn Cullis-Suzuki work alongside scientists, organic farmers, artists and quirky islanders to create a synergy of sustainable development. But Haida Gwaii sits squarely in the path of the proposed Tar Sands seaway to Asia. The desperate fight to protect land and sea may be just beginning. (Lynne Fernie, reprinted from Hot Docs website)

    Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World won the Best Canadian Feature Documentary Award at Hot Docs 2015.

    "A wonderful film about the environment that doesn't just talk about solutions, but shows people actually putting those ideas to good use." (William Brownridge, Toronto Film Scene)

    "…spectacular-looking, unforgettable..." (Marsha Lederman, The Globe and Mail)

    "The genius of this movie is that you see most of the sides of this people. The film is not trying to force you to feel something, but to make you aware of something that is as true for the Haida people as it is for everyone—we have a limited planet, we need to make the best use of it we can in order to continue to be ourselves. Figuring out who that should be is the greatest challenge that the film extends to all who watch it." (Jess Rogers, The Matinee)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Tu dors Nicole
    Sunday October 25, 4:00p–5:33p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A critical hit at Cannes, the third fiction feature by Stéphane Lafleur (Continental, un film sans fusil) once again displays his trademark absurdist humour and sense of ennui, honing in on twentysomethings at an existential crossroads.

    Nicole (Julianne Côté, Sarah Prefers to Run) is adrift after her graduation, working a dead-end summer job in her small Quebec hometown and lazing away her evenings with her best pal Véronique (Catherine St-Laurent). Nicole is looking forward to having the house to herself while her parents are away on vacation—until her older brother Remi (Marc-André Grondin, C.R.A.Z.Y.) unexpectedly returns with his bandmates in tow, disrupting the girls’ languid summer. Friendships quickly cool when Remi’s new drummer, JF (Simon Larouche), piques Nicole’s interest, and it becomes clear that something has to—and will—change.

    Shot in luminous black and white, Tu dors Nicole is infused with a gorgeously sultry melancholy, particularly in the scenes where the insomniac Nicole wanders her neighbourhood in the middle of the night, marvelling at how much goes on while the rest of the world is asleep. Brilliantly capturing that liminal stage where the fading yet familiar attachments of childhood still seem far more appealing than the sterility of the grown-up world, Tu dors Nicole shows one of our finest young filmmakers at the peak of his powers.

    "Lafleur maintains a bouncy, consistently funny tone that you'd describe as featherlight, were there not real weight grounding it all. It's a near-miraculous trick, and evidence of the immense talent on display here: he has a real talent for making comedy work visually, and as you might expect from a former editor, a sense not just for landing a joke, but for creating a unique and distinctive rhythm." (Oliver Lyttelton, The Playlist)

    "Lafleur delivers an affecting, funny and eccentric—in the best sense of the word—meditation on that in-between state that people in their early twenties find themselves, as they are technically old enough to participate fully in all of life’s activities but they still lack the experience to know what they really want or what’s really good for them." (Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Tu dors Nicole
    Sunday October 25, 7:00p–8:33p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A critical hit at Cannes, the third fiction feature by Stéphane Lafleur (Continental, un film sans fusil) once again displays his trademark absurdist humour and sense of ennui, honing in on twentysomethings at an existential crossroads.

    Nicole (Julianne Côté, Sarah Prefers to Run) is adrift after her graduation, working a dead-end summer job in her small Quebec hometown and lazing away her evenings with her best pal Véronique (Catherine St-Laurent). Nicole is looking forward to having the house to herself while her parents are away on vacation—until her older brother Remi (Marc-André Grondin, C.R.A.Z.Y.) unexpectedly returns with his bandmates in tow, disrupting the girls’ languid summer. Friendships quickly cool when Remi’s new drummer, JF (Simon Larouche), piques Nicole’s interest, and it becomes clear that something has to—and will—change.

    Shot in luminous black and white, Tu dors Nicole is infused with a gorgeously sultry melancholy, particularly in the scenes where the insomniac Nicole wanders her neighbourhood in the middle of the night, marvelling at how much goes on while the rest of the world is asleep. Brilliantly capturing that liminal stage where the fading yet familiar attachments of childhood still seem far more appealing than the sterility of the grown-up world, Tu dors Nicole shows one of our finest young filmmakers at the peak of his powers.

    "Lafleur maintains a bouncy, consistently funny tone that you'd describe as featherlight, were there not real weight grounding it all. It's a near-miraculous trick, and evidence of the immense talent on display here: he has a real talent for making comedy work visually, and as you might expect from a former editor, a sense not just for landing a joke, but for creating a unique and distinctive rhythm." (Oliver Lyttelton, The Playlist)

    "Lafleur delivers an affecting, funny and eccentric—in the best sense of the word—meditation on that in-between state that people in their early twenties find themselves, as they are technically old enough to participate fully in all of life’s activities but they still lack the experience to know what they really want or what’s really good for them." (Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night
    Wednesday October 28, 7:00p–8:41p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    "For centuries, vampires have provided handy metaphors for social and physical dilemma, but in the stylishly muted deadpan romance A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, the threat is personal. Writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour's stunning debut, produced by Elijah Wood, follows the experiences of a small Iranian town haunted by a vampiric presence who is just as lonely as the other locals. Shot in gorgeously expressionistic black-and-white and fusing multiple genres into a thoroughly original whole, Amirpour has crafted a beguiling, cryptic and often surprisingly funny look at personal desire that creeps up on you with the nimble powers of its supernatural focus. The director combines elements of film noir and the restraint of Iranian New Wave cinema with the subdued depictions of a bored youth culture found in early Jim Jarmusch…the comparisons go on and on, but the result is wholly original.

    From the first frame to its last, the movie establishes a spellbinding atmosphere with long takes, deep shadows, and lively music cues ironically positioned against the cerebral quality of the storytelling, hinting at the vitality threatening to burst forth from its lethargic universe at any moment. Set in the fictional Iranian ghost town tellingly labeled Bad City—but actually shot in California—A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night initially focuses on the downtrodden plight of Arash (Arash Marandi), a hip young man who wanders the empty streets accompanied by his husky cat. Coping with the destructive junkie habits of his bumbling father (Marshall Manesh) and staving off the oppression of local crime lord Saeed (Dominic Rains), Arash says little but constantly moves around, his grave expression connoting a desire to take control of his life. The opportunity arrives in a remarkable sequence in which criminal Saeed takes home a quiet, stone-faced woman (Sheila Vand, Argo) he finds on the street, performs a bizarrely tribalistic dance of seduction and attempts to get physical with her—before she drains his blood dry. Arash arrives at Saeed's home shortly after the incident, discovers the body and jacks his drugs to launch his own street business.

    Meanwhile, Amirpour fleshes out the somber life of the mysterious vampire woman, a doe-faced goth who wears a chic striped shirt visible beneath her burka. Though her origins remain obscured, as she trails various locals late at night, she quickly turns into the face of repression burdening all of them. When she traumatizes a neighborhood boy and threatens to watch his behavior for the rest of his life, it is the first indication of a light at the end of the tunnel, a means of righting the wrongs in this broken world. But it is not until she forms a curiously moving romance with Arash—whom she discovers drugged up after a late night costume party, dressed as Dracula—that A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night truly moves beyond its elegant form and develops an emotional core." (Eric Kohn, indieWIRE)

    "A new vampire classic, one to treasure endlessly." (Drew Taylor, The Playlist)

    "It is the way in which the writer-director uses the specter of vampires and vices to take an off-center cut at Iranian gender politics and U.S.-Eurocentric pop culture that sets the film apart." (Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times)

    "Beguiling in its strangeness, yet also effortlessly evoking recognizable emotions such as loneliness and the feeling of being stuck in a dead-end town and life, this moody and gorgeous film is finally more about atmosphere and emotions than narrative—and none the worse for it." (Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    ’71
    Sunday November 1, 4:00p–5:39p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A gripping and intense thriller set on the mean streets of Belfast in the early years of the Troubles, ’71 is a remarkably assured feature debut for director Yann Demange. Written by Scottish playwright Gregory
    Burke (who effectively explored soldier psychology in his award-winning stage play Black Watch), ’71 skillfully navigates the bloody politics of the era to focus on the horrors suffered by ordinary soldiers and civilians at the heart of this brutal conflict.

    Rising star Jack O’Connell (Unbroken, Starred Up) gives a galvanizing performance as Gary Hook, a fresh British recruit whose unit is dispatched to help with peacekeeping in the Northern Irish capital during the fatefully violent year of 1971. After a routine house raid in the Catholic part of town goes awry, Gary finds himself separated from his unit and pursued by an armed gang of Provisional IRA fighters. With night closing in and no idea how to get back to his barracks, he must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, whose nominal sympathies by no means translate into guarantees of sanctuary.

    Visceral and palpably tense, ’71 offers a grunt’s-eye view of a brutal and complex conflict, with O’Connell undeniably impressive and wholly convincing in his naïve and disbelieving reactions to the horrors around him. Beautifully shot, sporting an atmospheric production design that fully immerses you in the fraught and claustrophobic setting, and directed with a great sense of pace and excitement, ’71 is a haunting story of survival that elevates a specific situation to universal relevance.

    "Swift and exciting, with no taste for the usual war movie heroics, first-time feature film director Yann Demange's film belongs on a short list of immersive, rattling, authentic fictions right next door to the fact of survival inside a war zone." (Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune)

    "As much an urban thriller as a war movie ... this outstanding, muscular feature debut for French-born, British-based director Yann Demange almost never puts a foot wrong, from the softly underplayed performances to the splendidly speckled cinematography and fine-grained period detailing." (Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    ’71
    Sunday November 1, 7:00p–8:39p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A gripping and intense thriller set on the mean streets of Belfast in the early years of the Troubles, ’71 is a remarkably assured feature debut for director Yann Demange. Written by Scottish playwright Gregory
    Burke (who effectively explored soldier psychology in his award-winning stage play Black Watch), ’71 skillfully navigates the bloody politics of the era to focus on the horrors suffered by ordinary soldiers and civilians at the heart of this brutal conflict.

    Rising star Jack O’Connell (Unbroken, Starred Up) gives a galvanizing performance as Gary Hook, a fresh British recruit whose unit is dispatched to help with peacekeeping in the Northern Irish capital during the fatefully violent year of 1971. After a routine house raid in the Catholic part of town goes awry, Gary finds himself separated from his unit and pursued by an armed gang of Provisional IRA fighters. With night closing in and no idea how to get back to his barracks, he must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, whose nominal sympathies by no means translate into guarantees of sanctuary.

    Visceral and palpably tense, ’71 offers a grunt’s-eye view of a brutal and complex conflict, with O’Connell undeniably impressive and wholly convincing in his naïve and disbelieving reactions to the horrors around him. Beautifully shot, sporting an atmospheric production design that fully immerses you in the fraught and claustrophobic setting, and directed with a great sense of pace and excitement, ’71 is a haunting story of survival that elevates a specific situation to universal relevance.

    "Swift and exciting, with no taste for the usual war movie heroics, first-time feature film director Yann Demange's film belongs on a short list of immersive, rattling, authentic fictions right next door to the fact of survival inside a war zone." (Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune)

    "As much an urban thriller as a war movie ... this outstanding, muscular feature debut for French-born, British-based director Yann Demange almost never puts a foot wrong, from the softly underplayed performances to the splendidly speckled cinematography and fine-grained period detailing." (Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    Hamlet
    Friday November 13, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: Available now at all Ticketpro outlets • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Cochrane's Pharmasave, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    In Shakespeare's Hamlet, as a country arms itself for war, a family tears itself apart. Forced to revenge his father's death but paralysed by the task ahead, Hamlet rages against the impossibility of his predicament, threatening both his sanity and the security of the state.

    Benedict Cumberbatch stars as the Prince of Denmark.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com

  • CINEMA
    Testament of Youth
    Sunday November 15, 4:00p–6:09p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Directed by British television veteran James Kent and adapted for the screen by Juliette Towhidi, Testament of Youth is a powerful story of love, war, and remembrance, based on the First World War memoir by Vera Brittain, which has become the classic testimony of that war from a woman's point of view. A searing journey from youthful hopes and dreams to the edge of despair and back again, it is a film about young love, the futility of war, and how to make sense of the darkest times.

    The film begins on Armistice Day 1918, then flashes back four years to a scene of Vera (Alicia Vikander, Ex Machina, Anna Karenina, A Royal Affair), her younger brother Edward (Taron Egerton) and his prep school friends Victor Richardson (Colin Morgan) and Roland Leighton (Kit Harington) frolicking in the countryside.

    Vera chafes at her parents’ efforts to groom her into a model future wife. Determined to go to Oxford, she rejects the piano her father (Dominic West, Pride) gives her and reminds him that it cost the same as a year in college. Contrary to the wishes of her severe, eagle-eyed mother (Emily Watson, Belle, Oranges and Sunshine), Vera is not a flower waiting to be picked by a wealthy suitor, and her parents are aghast when she announces she will never marry. A wary attraction develops between Vera and Roland, both of whom write poetry, but they can meet only with a chaperone present. Nevertheless, they fall in love.

    No sooner is war declared than first Roland, then Edward, then Victor succumb to war fever and heed the call to fight. Vera’s father relents and sends her to Oxford. However, unable to concentrate, she soon leaves Oxford to volunteer as a nurse and eventually ends up at Etaples, a hospital in France close to the front lines, where the monstrous extent of the carnage she sees is almost too much to bear.

    "Unapologetically emotional and impeccably made in the classic manner, it tells the kind of potent, many-sided story whose unforeseen complexities can come only courtesy of a life that lived them all." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    "Striking an elegantly sustained balance between intimacy and historical scope, director James Kent's WWI-set epic Testament of Youth encompasses nearly all of the virtues of classical British period drama and nearly none of the vices." (Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "Alicia Vikander has fully and memorably arrived, a luminous presence with a gift for tenderness, an instinct for understatement and formidable reserves of passion—she not only rises to the challenge of Vera’s climactic speech, but elevates the pacifist rhetoric into furious poetry." (Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Testament of Youth
    Sunday November 15, 7:00p–9:09p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Directed by British television veteran James Kent and adapted for the screen by Juliette Towhidi, Testament of Youth is a powerful story of love, war, and remembrance, based on the First World War memoir by Vera Brittain, which has become the classic testimony of that war from a woman's point of view. A searing journey from youthful hopes and dreams to the edge of despair and back again, it is a film about young love, the futility of war, and how to make sense of the darkest times.

    The film begins on Armistice Day 1918, then flashes back four years to a scene of Vera (Alicia Vikander, Ex Machina, Anna Karenina, A Royal Affair), her younger brother Edward (Taron Egerton) and his prep school friends Victor Richardson (Colin Morgan) and Roland Leighton (Kit Harington) frolicking in the countryside.

    Vera chafes at her parents’ efforts to groom her into a model future wife. Determined to go to Oxford, she rejects the piano her father (Dominic West, Pride) gives her and reminds him that it cost the same as a year in college. Contrary to the wishes of her severe, eagle-eyed mother (Emily Watson, Belle, Oranges and Sunshine), Vera is not a flower waiting to be picked by a wealthy suitor, and her parents are aghast when she announces she will never marry. A wary attraction develops between Vera and Roland, both of whom write poetry, but they can meet only with a chaperone present. Nevertheless, they fall in love.

    No sooner is war declared than first Roland, then Edward, then Victor succumb to war fever and heed the call to fight. Vera’s father relents and sends her to Oxford. However, unable to concentrate, she soon leaves Oxford to volunteer as a nurse and eventually ends up at Etaples, a hospital in France close to the front lines, where the monstrous extent of the carnage she sees is almost too much to bear.

    "Unapologetically emotional and impeccably made in the classic manner, it tells the kind of potent, many-sided story whose unforeseen complexities can come only courtesy of a life that lived them all." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    "Striking an elegantly sustained balance between intimacy and historical scope, director James Kent's WWI-set epic Testament of Youth encompasses nearly all of the virtues of classical British period drama and nearly none of the vices." (Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "Alicia Vikander has fully and memorably arrived, a luminous presence with a gift for tenderness, an instinct for understatement and formidable reserves of passion—she not only rises to the challenge of Vera’s climactic speech, but elevates the pacifist rhetoric into furious poetry." (Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Court
    Sunday November 22, 4:00p–5:56p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Winner of top prizes at the Venice and Mumbai film festivals, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court is a quietly devastating, absurdist portrait of injustice, caste prejudice, and venal politics in contemporary India. An elderly folk singer and grassroots organizer, dubbed the “people’s poet,” is arrested on a trumped-up charge of inciting a sewage worker, whose dead body is found inside a manhole in Mumbai, to commit suicide. His trial is a ridiculous and harrowing display of institutional incompetence, with endless procedural delays, coached witnesses for the prosecution, and obsessive privileging of arcane colonial law over reason and mercy.

    What truly distinguishes Court, however, is Tamhane’s brilliant ensemble cast of professional and nonprofessional actors; his affecting mixture of comedy and tragedy; and his naturalist approach to his characters and to Indian society as a whole, rich with complexity and contradiction.

    Director's Statement:

    I was surprised by my urge to explore the Indian judiciary. After all, so much has been done and said in the genre of courtroom dramas. But when I attended a nondescript lower court in suburban Mumbai, the sheer lack of drama, and the casualness with which life and death decisions were being made, was what sparked my imagination. Every face has a story of its own; the stenographer who disinterestedly types away all day, the peon who runs errands for a small bribe, the inarticulate lawyers reading out long, technical passages from outdated law books, the appellants who have probably spent years waiting for their case number to be called out. Amidst all this theatre, are the hopes and fears of ordinary people, who cling on to every word they can understand, as their fates are decided.

    Although the film is set in very peculiar sub-cultures of Mumbai, the attempt is to explore the invisible fabric of a collective. The characters are constantly acting upon the invisible triggers of caste and class politics, patriarchy, and feudalism. The challenge for me was to lend dignity and humanity to these people, despite their flaws. (Chaitanya Tamhane)

    "Indian filmmaker Chaitanya Tamhane’s first feature is a masterpiece, one of the best films of the year." (Laya Maheshwari, RogerEbert.com)

    "Managing to be both extremely rational and extremely humane, the film works so well thanks to an intelligent, superbly understated script and a feel for naturalism that extends beyond mere performance." (Jay Weissberg, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Court
    Sunday November 22, 7:00p–8:56p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Winner of top prizes at the Venice and Mumbai film festivals, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court is a quietly devastating, absurdist portrait of injustice, caste prejudice, and venal politics in contemporary India. An elderly folk singer and grassroots organizer, dubbed the “people’s poet,” is arrested on a trumped-up charge of inciting a sewage worker, whose dead body is found inside a manhole in Mumbai, to commit suicide. His trial is a ridiculous and harrowing display of institutional incompetence, with endless procedural delays, coached witnesses for the prosecution, and obsessive privileging of arcane colonial law over reason and mercy.

    What truly distinguishes Court, however, is Tamhane’s brilliant ensemble cast of professional and nonprofessional actors; his affecting mixture of comedy and tragedy; and his naturalist approach to his characters and to Indian society as a whole, rich with complexity and contradiction.

    Director's Statement:

    I was surprised by my urge to explore the Indian judiciary. After all, so much has been done and said in the genre of courtroom dramas. But when I attended a nondescript lower court in suburban Mumbai, the sheer lack of drama, and the casualness with which life and death decisions were being made, was what sparked my imagination. Every face has a story of its own; the stenographer who disinterestedly types away all day, the peon who runs errands for a small bribe, the inarticulate lawyers reading out long, technical passages from outdated law books, the appellants who have probably spent years waiting for their case number to be called out. Amidst all this theatre, are the hopes and fears of ordinary people, who cling on to every word they can understand, as their fates are decided.

    Although the film is set in very peculiar sub-cultures of Mumbai, the attempt is to explore the invisible fabric of a collective. The characters are constantly acting upon the invisible triggers of caste and class politics, patriarchy, and feudalism. The challenge for me was to lend dignity and humanity to these people, despite their flaws. (Chaitanya Tamhane)

    "Indian filmmaker Chaitanya Tamhane’s first feature is a masterpiece, one of the best films of the year." (Laya Maheshwari, RogerEbert.com)

    "Managing to be both extremely rational and extremely humane, the film works so well thanks to an intelligent, superbly understated script and a feel for naturalism that extends beyond mere performance." (Jay Weissberg, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    All the Time in the World
    Wednesday November 25, 7:00p–8:29p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In search of a new perspective, a family of five leave the comforts of home to live remotely in the Yukon wilderness during the long northern winter and amidst the surprises that the rawness of nature provide. The parents leave their jobs and take their three children, ages 10, 8 and 4, to spend nine months living in a small cabin with no road access, no electricity, no running water, and no internet, no TV, no phone and, most importantly, no clocks or watches.

    Filmed over 9 months, off the grid, without external crew, and featuring the unique perspectives of children, All The Time In The World explores the theme of disconnecting from our hectic and technology laden lives in order to reconnect with each other, ourselves and our natural environment—parents connecting with children, children connecting with nature.

    Yukon filmmaker Suzanne Crocker switched careers from rural family physician to filmmaker in 2009. Her award winning short film Time Lines (2010) screened at film festivals in Canada, the US and Europe, and was selected for a National Film Board Filmmakers Assistance Grant. All The Time In The World represents Suzanne Crocker’s feature film directing debut. It was among the top 20 audience favourites at this years' Hot Docs and has won many awards around the world.

    The soundtrack for All The Time In The World features original music from finger style acoustic guitarist and composer, Alex Houghton and Juno nominated singer songwriter Anne Louise Genest.

    "Anyone watching this film will have to ask, what is life all about, why am I in such a hurry, what is it that gives us true happiness. Thank you for making a film that demands that we answer those questions." (David Suzuki)

    "[T]his contemplative meditation offers a tantalizing look at a different way to live your life—provoking questions (and perhaps guilt trips) for the viewers about how they live theirs." (Marsha Lederman, The Globe and Mail)

    "All the Time in the World is a pretty remarkable achievement, capturing both the breathtaking beauty of the natural landscape, and the surprising success of their social experiment. Beautifully filmed and completely endearing, this is an inspiring look at voluntary simplicity and how it brings a family closer together, that will leave you wanting to take time off and live in the wilderness for a few months." (John Corrado, onemovieourviews.com)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Wet Bum
    Sunday November 29, 4:00p–5:38p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A coming-of-age movie driven by sharp observations and a poetic sensitivity towards outcasts, first-time feature filmmaker Lindsay MacKay’s Wet Bum is graced by an exceptional lead turn from 2014 TIFF Rising Star Julia Sarah Stone (The Year Dolly Parton Was My Mom), whose performance is exquisitely crafted yet feels wonderfully devoid of guile.

    Forced by her mother to work in the seniors’ residence she manages, fourteen-year-old Sam (Stone) endures a daily gauntlet of cleaning rooms and dealing with disgruntled residents. In addition, Sam’s slower physical development has made her very self-conscious about her body—an uneasiness that has not gone unnoticed by the fellow students in her swim class—and her swim instructor has become
    strangely solicitous of her.

    Unhappy amongst her schoolmates, Sam finds herself increasingly drawn to two of the residents at the seniors’ home: silent Judith (Diana Leblanc), who acknowledges Sam exclusively, and Ed (Kenneth Welsh, The Art of the Steal), whose persistent rants and attempts to hitch a ride to a mysterious location intrigue and trouble her. As her relationship with them deepens, Sam is drawn into worlds far more complex than the one inhabited by her peers.

    Featuring a stellar supporting cast (including Leah Pinsent as Sam’s harried mother) and several wonderful set pieces—including a mid-winter party in an unfinished house that encapsulates all the thrills and horrors of small-town adolescence—Wet Bum is a poignant debut whose hard-won wisdom belies the youth of both its star and director.

    "Another great debut Canadian feature in a year full of great debuts, this almost painfully realistic coming of age tale deals with body issues, awkward burgeoning sexuality, and how the young and old interact with splendid results." (Andrew Parker, Dorkshelf.com)

    "Even though the story may seem slight, as coming-of-age tales go, it packs a surprising amount of emotional power and wisdom." (Bruce Demara, Toronto Star)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Wet Bum
    Sunday November 29, 7:00p–8:38p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A coming-of-age movie driven by sharp observations and a poetic sensitivity towards outcasts, first-time feature filmmaker Lindsay MacKay’s Wet Bum is graced by an exceptional lead turn from 2014 TIFF Rising Star Julia Sarah Stone (The Year Dolly Parton Was My Mom), whose performance is exquisitely crafted yet feels wonderfully devoid of guile.

    Forced by her mother to work in the seniors’ residence she manages, fourteen-year-old Sam (Stone) endures a daily gauntlet of cleaning rooms and dealing with disgruntled residents. In addition, Sam’s slower physical development has made her very self-conscious about her body—an uneasiness that has not gone unnoticed by the fellow students in her swim class—and her swim instructor has become
    strangely solicitous of her.

    Unhappy amongst her schoolmates, Sam finds herself increasingly drawn to two of the residents at the seniors’ home: silent Judith (Diana Leblanc), who acknowledges Sam exclusively, and Ed (Kenneth Welsh, The Art of the Steal), whose persistent rants and attempts to hitch a ride to a mysterious location intrigue and trouble her. As her relationship with them deepens, Sam is drawn into worlds far more complex than the one inhabited by her peers.

    Featuring a stellar supporting cast (including Leah Pinsent as Sam’s harried mother) and several wonderful set pieces—including a mid-winter party in an unfinished house that encapsulates all the thrills and horrors of small-town adolescence—Wet Bum is a poignant debut whose hard-won wisdom belies the youth of both its star and director.

    "Another great debut Canadian feature in a year full of great debuts, this almost painfully realistic coming of age tale deals with body issues, awkward burgeoning sexuality, and how the young and old interact with splendid results." (Andrew Parker, Dorkshelf.com)

    "Even though the story may seem slight, as coming-of-age tales go, it packs a surprising amount of emotional power and wisdom." (Bruce Demara, Toronto Star)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence
    Wednesday December 2, 7:00p–8:41p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Swedish master Roy Andersson (Songs from the Second Floor) returns with this absurdist, surrealistic and shocking pitch-black comedy, which moves freely from nightmare to fantasy to hilariously deadpan humour as it muses on man’s perpetual inhumanity to man.

    The most distinctive Swedish filmmaker since Ingmar Bergman, Roy Andersson has influenced the work of filmmakers as different as Ruben Östlund (Force Majeure) and Finland's Dome Karukoski (The Grump). Andersson's new film, the third part of a trilogy that began with Songs from the Second Floor and continued with You, the Living, demonstrates exactly why his influence is so powerful and pervasive. Filmmakers a quarter his age would not venture the risks he takes here, and his skill and craft rival those of the great masters.

    A mixture of absurdist, hilariously deadpan humour, shock, and utter horror. A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence presents a series of darkly comic vignettes organized around two narrative strands. In one, two hapless novelty salesmen wander around town trying to sell their inventory of vampire fangs and rubber masks, all the while bickering like an old married couple; in the other, Charles XII, Sweden's most bellicose king, reappears in modern times to carry on his series of disastrous defeats. Shifting between nightmare, fantasy, reverie, and even an impromptu musical number, the film culminates with a blistering indictment of what Andersson presents as humanity's stunning lack of empathy.

    Though he has been called a slapstick Bergman and compared to Fellini, Andersson is closest to Luis Buñuel in both his surrealist flourishes and the rage—as well as the genuine empathy and sorrow—that underlies his twisted humour. Andersson has said that A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence was heavily influenced by Dostoevsky and, like the work of the Russian master, his film is not for the faint of heart. It is an extremely provocative and very disturbing critique of our times.

    "What a bold, beguiling and utterly unclassifiable director Andersson is. He thinks life is a comedy and feels it’s a tragedy, and is able to wrestle these conflicting impulses into a gorgeous, deadpan deadlock." (Xan Brooks, The Guardian)

    "As with every beautiful, unearthly segment of Pigeon, the only certainty is life's endlessly puzzling nature." (Eric Kohn, indieWIRE)

    "Pigeon is a near-perfect cap to a near-perfect trilogy, a cavalcade of oddness, humor, banality and even horror." (Jessica Kiang, The Playlist)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
    Sunday December 6, 4:00p–5:45p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann) is an awkward, self-deprecating high school student determined to coast through his senior year as anonymously as possible. Avoiding social interactions like the plague, Greg spends most of his time remaking wacky versions of classic movies with his only friend, Earl (RJ Cyler). Greg’s well-meaning mother (Connie Britton) intervenes, forcing him to befriend Rachel (Olivia Cooke), a classmate who has been diagnosed with leukemia. Against his better judgment, Greg concedes. Both Greg and Rachel are surprised—even shocked—to find out that they actually like each other. Tentative at first, this unlikely duo becomes inseparable. But when Rachel gets sicker, Greg’s well-fortified world is changed forever.

    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, an adaptation of a book by Jesse Andrews, is a film about finding out who you are in the world. It is a film—in fact, a film that loves film, celebrates film, and is very much about the medium—with beautiful shot composition, tense long takes and elaborate tracking shots. It tells a touching and incredibly funny story with very realistic, honest characters and enough self-awareness to make it all feel modern. Directed by Alfonso Gomez-Rejon and adapted by Andrews, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl won the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at the 2015 Sundance Festival.

    "Me and Earl and the Dying Girl has those handkerchief moments, but the laughs far outnumber the hard and sad punches. This is a movie that’s grounded in reality, has just enough whimsy and soars to the stars. It’s one of the best films of 2015." (Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times)

    "It's a fresh, beautiful and heartbreaking achievement that continues to surprise until the very last scene. It's dangerous to call something an instant classic, but sometimes it's simply the truth." (Gregory Ellwood, Hitfix)

    "A smart-ass charmer, merciless tearjerker and sincere celebration of teenage creativity." (John DeFore, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
    Sunday December 6, 7:00p–8:45p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann) is an awkward, self-deprecating high school student determined to coast through his senior year as anonymously as possible. Avoiding social interactions like the plague, Greg spends most of his time remaking wacky versions of classic movies with his only friend, Earl (RJ Cyler). Greg’s well-meaning mother (Connie Britton) intervenes, forcing him to befriend Rachel (Olivia Cooke), a classmate who has been diagnosed with leukemia. Against his better judgment, Greg concedes. Both Greg and Rachel are surprised—even shocked—to find out that they actually like each other. Tentative at first, this unlikely duo becomes inseparable. But when Rachel gets sicker, Greg’s well-fortified world is changed forever.

    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, an adaptation of a book by Jesse Andrews, is a film about finding out who you are in the world. It is a film—in fact, a film that loves film, celebrates film, and is very much about the medium—with beautiful shot composition, tense long takes and elaborate tracking shots. It tells a touching and incredibly funny story with very realistic, honest characters and enough self-awareness to make it all feel modern. Directed by Alfonso Gomez-Rejon and adapted by Andrews, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl won the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at the 2015 Sundance Festival.

    "Me and Earl and the Dying Girl has those handkerchief moments, but the laughs far outnumber the hard and sad punches. This is a movie that’s grounded in reality, has just enough whimsy and soars to the stars. It’s one of the best films of 2015." (Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times)

    "It's a fresh, beautiful and heartbreaking achievement that continues to surprise until the very last scene. It's dangerous to call something an instant classic, but sometimes it's simply the truth." (Gregory Ellwood, Hitfix)

    "A smart-ass charmer, merciless tearjerker and sincere celebration of teenage creativity." (John DeFore, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Around the World in 50 Concerts
    Wednesday December 9, 7:00p–8:35p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In 2013 Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra's 125th anniversary tour sent it Around the World in 50 Concerts, but famed Dutch documentarian Heddy Honigmann's (O amor natural, Metal and Melancholy) film follows a more modest itinerary, highlighting stopovers in Argentina, South Africa and Russia showing how the ensemble succeeds in gaining the hearts of people with a different cultural background .

    A magnificent tapestry of sounds and images, this documentary interweaves multiple leitmotifs that flow through the film like familiar old friends, surging to the forefront only to be reabsorbed and casually encountered farther on. Honigmann focuses on individual orchestra and audience members without fanfare, allowing them virtuoso riffs but never losing sight of the ensemble. The tour develops not just into a journey across the globe but also as a trip to the core of classical music, a quest for the palette of emotions which only classical music can arouse.

    Directors statement:

    Can you imagine a single day in the world without music? I think that it would be like a scene from a science fiction film in which evil forces suddenly bring all movement—life itself— to a stop. A terrifying, frozen world. (Heddy Honigmann, August 2014)

    "Honest-to-goodness competence, born of a shared love of music, reigns throughout: The fragmented details of Honigmann’s canvas fit together with admirable synergy, not unrelated to the friendly professional teamwork that unites the working musicians. But it is the way Honigmann often weaves a subtle continuum around these otherwise discrete stories that makes her film so special. Over dinner in a restaurant in Argentina, a flautist confesses his love of folk themes, inside and outside of classical music, even extending to popular song. Shortly thereafter, the piquant tweaking of Frere Jacques in Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 is heard as the camera moves over the streets of Buenos Aires when the orchestra leaves the city. And in a particularly atmospheric nocturnal scene, half of Amsterdam seemingly turns out in nostalgic, candlelit celebration, watching from boats and windows along the canal as a resonant baritone, accompanied by Concertgebouw, with the self-same flautist among them, swings into a rousing rendition of the city’s unofficial anthem, Aan de Amsterdamse grachten." (Ronnie Scheib, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Grandma
    Sunday December 13, 4:00p–5:19p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Comedy legend Lily Tomlin (I Heart Huckabees) shines in this spirited and touching film from director Paul Weitz (About a Boy), a sharply observed comedy-drama about intergenerational relationships and how our past is never really left behind.

    Tomlin stars as aging poet and quick-witted grump Elle, who as the film opens has just ended her relationship with a much younger woman (Judy Greer, The Descendants). Still mourning the death of her long-time partner, Elle is also struggling to make ends meet as interest in her poetry diminishes and aca-demic jobs are few and far between. In the midst of her own troubles, Elle receives a surprise visit from her teenage granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner, Martha Marcy May Marlene), who is pregnant and in dire need of cash for her doctor’s appointment later that same day. Elle is unable to loan Sage the money, and both are unwilling to ask Sage’s uptight and out-of-touch mother (Marcia Gay Harden, Magic in the Moonlight), so the pair set out in Elle’s vintage (i.e. ancient) car to try and cobble together the cash from Elle’s old friends and old flames (one of whom is played by the always wonderful Sam Elliott (I'll See You in My Dreams, Up in the Air). As this odd couple faces a number of obstacles in the course of their journey and Sage begins to learn about her grandmother’s complex past, the two women are able to achieve a new honesty in their relationship, and begin to chart a way forward together.

    It is no surprise that Tomlin is ideal as Elle, both due to her masterful comic timing and her ability to reveal depths of vulnerability and emotion beneath a brittle exterior. Mixing laughter and tears to marvellous effect, Grandma addresses such subjects as loss, love and motherhood with both wry humour and refreshing honesty.

    "On the surface, Grandma is a simple story, but the script imbues it with deep reserves of emotional depth and meaning that are slowly, organically revealed over the course of the plot." (Katie Walsh, The Playlist)

    "Though likely to be variously praised and pilloried as a pro-choice film, Weitz’s film is really a movie about choice in both the specific and the abstract—about the choices we make, for good and for ill, and how we come to feel about them through the prism of time." (Scott Foundas, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • CINEMA
    Grandma
    Sunday December 13, 7:00p–8:19p
    Presented by Fundy Film Society
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Comedy legend Lily Tomlin (I Heart Huckabees) shines in this spirited and touching film from director Paul Weitz (About a Boy), a sharply observed comedy-drama about intergenerational relationships and how our past is never really left behind.

    Tomlin stars as aging poet and quick-witted grump Elle, who as the film opens has just ended her relationship with a much younger woman (Judy Greer, The Descendants). Still mourning the death of her long-time partner, Elle is also struggling to make ends meet as interest in her poetry diminishes and aca-demic jobs are few and far between. In the midst of her own troubles, Elle receives a surprise visit from her teenage granddaughter Sage (Julia Garner, Martha Marcy May Marlene), who is pregnant and in dire need of cash for her doctor’s appointment later that same day. Elle is unable to loan Sage the money, and both are unwilling to ask Sage’s uptight and out-of-touch mother (Marcia Gay Harden, Magic in the Moonlight), so the pair set out in Elle’s vintage (i.e. ancient) car to try and cobble together the cash from Elle’s old friends and old flames (one of whom is played by the always wonderful Sam Elliott (I'll See You in My Dreams, Up in the Air). As this odd couple faces a number of obstacles in the course of their journey and Sage begins to learn about her grandmother’s complex past, the two women are able to achieve a new honesty in their relationship, and begin to chart a way forward together.

    It is no surprise that Tomlin is ideal as Elle, both due to her masterful comic timing and her ability to reveal depths of vulnerability and emotion beneath a brittle exterior. Mixing laughter and tears to marvellous effect, Grandma addresses such subjects as loss, love and motherhood with both wry humour and refreshing honesty.

    "On the surface, Grandma is a simple story, but the script imbues it with deep reserves of emotional depth and meaning that are slowly, organically revealed over the course of the plot." (Katie Walsh, The Playlist)

    "Though likely to be variously praised and pilloried as a pro-choice film, Weitz’s film is really a movie about choice in both the specific and the abstract—about the choices we make, for good and for ill, and how we come to feel about them through the prism of time." (Scott Foundas, Variety)

    Contact: info@fundyfilm.ca  |  (902) 542-5157

  • THEATRE
    Jane Eyre
    Friday January 29, 7:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: Available now at all Ticketpro outlets • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Cochrane's Pharmasave, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    Almost 170 years on, Charlotte Brontë’s story of the trailblazing Jane is as inspiring as ever. This bold and dynamic production uncovers one woman’s fight for freedom and fulfilment on her own terms.

    From her beginnings as a destitute orphan, Jane Eyre’s spirited heroine faces life’s obstacles head-on, surviving poverty, injustice and the discovery of bitter betrayal before taking the ultimate decision to follow her heart.

    This acclaimed re-imagining of Brontë's masterpiece was first staged by Bristol Old Vic last year, when the story was performed over two evenings. Director Sally Cookson now brings her celebrated production to the National, presented as a single, exhilarating performance.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com

  • THEATRE
    Shakespeare's As You Like It
    Friday February 26, 7:00p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20

    Tickets: Available now at all Ticketpro outlets • Online at ticketpro.ca • By phone at 1-888-311-9090 • Home Hardware, Windsor • Cochrane's Pharmasave, Wolfville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Kentville • Wilsons Pharmasave, Berwick • or at the door one hour before the show

    Buy Tickets Online

    Shakespeare’s glorious comedy of love and change comes to the National Theatre for the first time in over 30 years, with Rosalie Craig (London Road, Macbeth at MIF) as Rosalind.

    With her father the Duke banished and in exile, Rosalind and her cousin Celia leave their lives in the court behind them and journey into the Forest of Arden.

    There, released from convention, Rosalind experiences the liberating rush of transformation. Disguising herself as a boy, she embraces a different way of living and falls spectacularly in love.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com