2-Week Calendar

Printable Version

November 18 - 24

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

November 25 - December 1

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

ALL UPCOMING EVENTS

  • CINEMA
    Nothing Like a Dame
    Wednesday November 21, 7:00p–8:24p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Sixty years ago, seismic changes ripped through the cultural establishment and, together with music and fashion, British theatre experienced an explosion of creativity and talent, the impact of which was felt around the world and is still tangible today.

    Pivotal to these creative and social shifts were a group of young actresses including Eileen Atkins, Judi Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith. All have received Damehoods in recognition of their outstanding contributions to the acting profession.

    Directed by Roger Michell, Nothing Like a Dame invites you to spend time with these icons as they talk about their lives now and then: their experience in theatre, TV and cinema and the memories they have from when they were bright young things right up to the present day – as they look back with the wisdom of their years.

    "Unrehearsed, spontaneous and off-the cuff, they don't hold back, their fearless charm is relaxed and effortless, and the relentless candor is enchanting. The result is 83 minutes of bliss spent with four Dames who know the difference between truth and illusion, and generously give a great deal of both (...) boredom is not an option." (Rex Reed, Observer)

    "It's delicious—sweet, tart, surprisingly moving and funny as hell." (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Whitflix Screening & Awards Ceremony w/ Bowfinger
    Friday November 23, 7:00p
    Presented by Acadia Cinema Cooperative
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: Free

    Come watch the winning Smartphone films and the awards ceremony.
    Following the awards we will be screening the comedy classic Bowfinger starring Steve Martin and Eddie Murphy.

    When a desperate movie producer fails to get a major star for his bargain basement film, he decides to shoot the film secretly around him.

    Contact: manager@alwhittletheatre.ca  |  902 542 3344

  • CINEMA
    The Children Act
    Sunday November 25, 4:00p–5:45p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Adapted by Booker Prize–winning author Ian McEwan from his own novel, this riveting drama stars two-time Academy Award winner Emma Thompson as a British High Court judge tasked with making a decision that will speak to our most fraught questions regarding religious tolerance—and could mean life or death for an innocent young man.

    Judge Fiona Maye (Thompson, An Education) is married to her work, which has become a problem for her husband, Jack (Stanley Tucci, Spotlight; Margin Call), who announces that he wants to have an affair. Treating the matter more as an annoyance than a life-altering crisis, Fiona kicks Jack out and focuses on her current case. The question: should a couple who are Jehovah's Witnesses be permitted to deny a life-saving blood transfusion to their leukemia-stricken 17-year-old son (Fionn Whitehead)? Fiona finds herself taking unusual measures to determine her verdict—measures that will have far-reaching consequences.

    Directed by Richard Eyre (Notes on a Scandal), The Children Act brims with intelligence, sophistication and intrigue. The elevated tension places unusual focus on its protagonist's every word and gesture—a challenge Thompson meets with virtuosity. Her Fiona is a cauldron of conflicted feelings bubbling beneath a veneer of composure. As she finds herself sliding deeper into a mire of professional compromise and personal desperation, we come to empathize with her singular burden… and wait for the outcome with keen anticipation.

    "The Children Act is a cerebral piece, for sure, and a disturbing one by the end, but Thompson's performance brings life to the complex moral questions it attempts to examine." (Fionnuala Halligan, Screen International)

    "The Children Act is that rarest of things: an adult drama, written and interpreted with a sensitivity to mature human concerns." (Peter Debruge, Variety)

    "The two central performances could hardly be better." (Stephen Farber, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    The Children Act
    Sunday November 25, 7:00p–8:45p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Adapted by Booker Prize–winning author Ian McEwan from his own novel, this riveting drama stars two-time Academy Award winner Emma Thompson as a British High Court judge tasked with making a decision that will speak to our most fraught questions regarding religious tolerance—and could mean life or death for an innocent young man.

    Judge Fiona Maye (Thompson, An Education) is married to her work, which has become a problem for her husband, Jack (Stanley Tucci, Spotlight; Margin Call), who announces that he wants to have an affair. Treating the matter more as an annoyance than a life-altering crisis, Fiona kicks Jack out and focuses on her current case. The question: should a couple who are Jehovah's Witnesses be permitted to deny a life-saving blood transfusion to their leukemia-stricken 17-year-old son (Fionn Whitehead)? Fiona finds herself taking unusual measures to determine her verdict—measures that will have far-reaching consequences.

    Directed by Richard Eyre (Notes on a Scandal), The Children Act brims with intelligence, sophistication and intrigue. The elevated tension places unusual focus on its protagonist's every word and gesture—a challenge Thompson meets with virtuosity. Her Fiona is a cauldron of conflicted feelings bubbling beneath a veneer of composure. As she finds herself sliding deeper into a mire of professional compromise and personal desperation, we come to empathize with her singular burden… and wait for the outcome with keen anticipation.

    "The Children Act is a cerebral piece, for sure, and a disturbing one by the end, but Thompson's performance brings life to the complex moral questions it attempts to examine." (Fionnuala Halligan, Screen International)

    "The Children Act is that rarest of things: an adult drama, written and interpreted with a sensitivity to mature human concerns." (Peter Debruge, Variety)

    "The two central performances could hardly be better." (Stephen Farber, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Sir
    Wednesday November 28, 7:00p–8:39p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    "Set inside the skyscrapers of modern-day Mumbai, Sir is not your typical Indian love story, nor does it necessarily work out the way you would expect.

    But in this thoughtful study of class and the way it can both restrain and empower, writer-director Rohena Gera has crafted an intelligent romance within the confines of upper-crust Indian society. Premiering in the Cannes Critics’ Week sidebar, the film could occupy the same slot that The Lunchbox did back in 2013.

    Ratna (Tillotama Shome, Monsoon Wedding) is a young widow who travels from her small village in the countryside to the megalopolis of Mumbai, where she’s employed by a wealthy family of builders to serve as a chambermaid for their son, Ashwin (Vivek Gomber, Court). When the film kicks off, Ashwin is about to get married, but we learn that the wedding has been called off after his fiancee was found to have had an affair. Left alone to work for his dad’s company and brood a lot around the house, Ashwin will slowly develop a bond with Ratna that extends beyond a mere master-servant relationship into something more.

    Keeping the drama limited to a high-rise apartment and a few exteriors, Gera uses a classic setup—forbidden love between two lost souls—to explore questions of class, and caste, in a city that has grown from its colonial roots into a burgeoning world capital. Thus, while Ashwin enjoys the pleasures of India’s new yuppie culture, throwing small parties and playing squash with his buddies, Ratna is confined to the kitchen and her tiny bedroom, yet can still pursue a fashion design career on the side. At an earlier epoch, she would have had few options and an affair with her master would have never been conceivable, but Gera shows how times have truly changed.

    Still, Indian society remains strictly hierarchical for the most part, and Sir ultimately reveals how unbridled emotions cannot survive in such an environment. Ashwin, who worked as a journalist in the U.S. before returning home after the death of his brother, is westernized in thought and attitude—he treats Ratna like a friend rather than a maid—but faces the pressure of his family and social standing. And Ratna, who as a young widow has very few opportunities in life, is smart enough to know that her story with Ashwin will never end happily ever after.

    Performances from the two leads—who switch between Hindi and English depending on the situation—are strong, although Shome is often more compelling than Gomber, whose character feels a bit too restrained at times. For her first fictional effort, Gera has crafted a warmly nuanced look at love in a place filled with constraints and contradictions, and where a broken heart could perhaps be the first step toward emancipation." (Jordan Mintzer, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "A Cinderella tale of sorts, the film nonetheless gains gravity for its insight into Indian social rigidities that tether both impoverished villagers and well-heeled urbanites." (Maggie Lee, Variety)

    "This is a delicately observed and attractive drama with some great Mumbai cityscapes and an excellent performance from Shome." (Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    What They Had
    Sunday December 2, 4:00p–5:41p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Why do families continue to fascinate on the big screen? Maybe because, amid the superheroes and fantasies that dazzle us, great films about family mirror our own lives, illuminating us at our best while reassuring us about our imperfections. Elizabeth Chomko contributes something new and valuable to the canon with What They Had. Based on her own screenplay, which won a coveted Nicholl Fellowship from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, this is a story of a family drawing closer even as illness threatens to tear it apart.

    Bridget (two-time Oscar-winner Hilary Swank) is forced to fly back home when her mother's cognitive decline leads to life-threatening actions. As she falls deeper into Alzheimer's disease, Ruth (Blythe Danner, I'll See You in My Dreams) recedes from everyday matters; she is fragile, but never fails to cut to the quick of what counts. Bridget's brother Nicky (Michael Shannon, The Shape of Water, Mud) refuses to indulge any sentiment about Ruth's illness. His hard pragmatism may just be his way of masking his pain at the thought of losing his mother, but it gnaws at the family's already-tenuous connections nonetheless.

    Chomko perfectly captures the rhythm of this group—the roles each has come to play, the conversations carried on in shorthand, the resentments and loyalties that define who each is to one another. Certain scenes look, sound, and feel transported from real life. In addition to the rich, authentic sibling dynamic that Swank and Shannon create, supporting performances from Robert Forster and Taissa Farmiga deepen the story as Ruth's behaviour pushes her family to a breaking point. For anyone who has lived, loved, suffered, and grown among family, What They Had offers many rewards.

    "There's raw power in Chomko's writing, but so much scrupulousness and craft that you feel safe when the time comes to weep. An Alzheimer’s Story That’s Both Heartbreaking and … Funny." (David Edelstein, Vulture)

    "An excellent cast hit the right notes in an evenly wrought family drama that rings true." (Brad Wheeler, Globe and Mail)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    What They Had
    Sunday December 2, 7:00p–8:41p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Why do families continue to fascinate on the big screen? Maybe because, amid the superheroes and fantasies that dazzle us, great films about family mirror our own lives, illuminating us at our best while reassuring us about our imperfections. Elizabeth Chomko contributes something new and valuable to the canon with What They Had. Based on her own screenplay, which won a coveted Nicholl Fellowship from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, this is a story of a family drawing closer even as illness threatens to tear it apart.

    Bridget (two-time Oscar-winner Hilary Swank) is forced to fly back home when her mother's cognitive decline leads to life-threatening actions. As she falls deeper into Alzheimer's disease, Ruth (Blythe Danner, I'll See You in My Dreams) recedes from everyday matters; she is fragile, but never fails to cut to the quick of what counts. Bridget's brother Nicky (Michael Shannon, The Shape of Water, Mud) refuses to indulge any sentiment about Ruth's illness. His hard pragmatism may just be his way of masking his pain at the thought of losing his mother, but it gnaws at the family's already-tenuous connections nonetheless.

    Chomko perfectly captures the rhythm of this group—the roles each has come to play, the conversations carried on in shorthand, the resentments and loyalties that define who each is to one another. Certain scenes look, sound, and feel transported from real life. In addition to the rich, authentic sibling dynamic that Swank and Shannon create, supporting performances from Robert Forster and Taissa Farmiga deepen the story as Ruth's behaviour pushes her family to a breaking point. For anyone who has lived, loved, suffered, and grown among family, What They Had offers many rewards.

    "There's raw power in Chomko's writing, but so much scrupulousness and craft that you feel safe when the time comes to weep. An Alzheimer’s Story That’s Both Heartbreaking and … Funny." (David Edelstein, Vulture)

    "An excellent cast hit the right notes in an evenly wrought family drama that rings true." (Brad Wheeler, Globe and Mail)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Maria by Callas
    Wednesday December 5, 7:00p–8:53p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Pulling back the curtain on one of the world’s most recognizable voices, Tom Volf’s Maria by Callas presents an intimate and carefully constructed portrait of revered soprano Maria Callas through a compilation of found footage, photographs, home videos and records, personal letters, and rare behind-the-scenes footage.

    Iconic both onstage and off, Maria Callas’ talent and operatic artistry brought her legions of fans and admirers from around the world. However, despite her success and widely esteemed talent, Maria’s artistic life was often eclipsed by her celebrity. With rumours, scandals, and intense public scrutiny plaguing her throughout her career, Maria frequently found herself forced to defend her work ethic and shield her personal life from the public, ultimately leading her to feel torn between her two identities: Maria and Callas.

    Meticulously weaving together rare archival material and employing Fanny Ardant’s (Paris je t’aime) careful voicework to bring Maria’s writing to life, Volf introduces a new generation of fans to Maria’s magnetic personality, unquestionable artistry and transcendent vocal performances, while also complicating the prevailing narrative surrounding her personal life and public image.

    "At the very least, it will send many viewers back to the recordings, some of them superior to the renditions heard here, with a more vivid picture of the extraordinary woman who made them." (Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • THEATRE
    Allelujah by Alan Bennett
    Friday December 7, 7:00p–9:45p
    Presented by Just Us! Coffee Roasters Co-op
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $15 at the door

    The Beth, an old fashioned cradle-to-grave hospital serving a town on the edge of the Pennines, is threatened with closure as part of an efficiency drive. A documentary crew, eager to capture its fight for survival, follows the daily struggle to find beds on the Dusty Springfield Geriatric Ward, and the triumphs of the old people’s choir.

    Alan Bennett’s celebrated plays include The History Boys, The Lady in the Van and The Madness of George III, all of which were also seen on film. Allelujah! is his tenth collaboration with award-winning director Nicholas Hytner.

    Contact: kathy@justuscoffee.com

  • CINEMA
    Puzzle
    Sunday December 9, 4:00p–5:43p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Producer Marc Turtletaub (Safety Not Guaranteed, Little Miss Sunshine) makes his directorial debut with Puzzle, a gently humanist story of an unassuming housewife who comes to recognize her unspoken hopes and dreams through the unlikely avenue of competitive jigsaw-puzzling.

    Agnes (Kelly Macdonald, Anna Karenina; No Country for Old Men) lives a quiet, monotonous life waiting hand-and-foot on her husband, Louie (David Denman) and her two adult sons. After an evening of birthday celebrations—she cleans, cooks and prepares the house for what turns out to be her own party—she notices a gift that strikes her interest: a jigsaw puzzle of a world map. Finishing the puzzle in record time, Agnes soon finds herself answering a "partner wanted" advertisement from puzzle champion Robert (Irrfan Khan, The Lunchbox; Life of Pi). As Agnes learns more about her gift at assembling the increasingly difficult puzzles Robert challenges her with, she also begins to give voice to her long-dormant desires.

    An adaptation of the 2009 Berlin Film Festival breakout hit of the same name from Argentina, Puzzle provides a sweet-natured glimpse into the complex interiority of what appears to be an entirely unremarkable life. Macdonald delivers a striking performance as Agnes, hinting at a deep longing for expression hidden beneath a lifetime of restraint. Puzzle asks us to consider what we might discover about ourselves if we allow that first spark of curiosity to ignite passion, courage and a little stubborn determination.

    "From its first elegantly shot frame, you know Puzzle is going to be something special. Turtletaub (...) ends Puzzle on such a delightful note of simplicity, that this near-perfect movie nevertheless stuns." (Jordan Ruimy, The Playlist)

    "Puzzle toes a tough line, managing to stay relentlessly good-hearted and deeply humane, even as Agnes herself plunges into deeper, more dramatic waters. It's the kind of mid-life crisis story that so rarely centers on a woman and Macdonald shines in the role, riveting even in the quietest of moments." (Kate Erbland, IndieWire)

    "It's a testament to Macdonald's performance (and later, to Khan's charm) that we share her passion for puzzling." (Wendy Ide, Screen International)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Puzzle
    Sunday December 9, 7:00p–8:43p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $10

    Producer Marc Turtletaub (Safety Not Guaranteed, Little Miss Sunshine) makes his directorial debut with Puzzle, a gently humanist story of an unassuming housewife who comes to recognize her unspoken hopes and dreams through the unlikely avenue of competitive jigsaw-puzzling.

    Agnes (Kelly Macdonald, Anna Karenina; No Country for Old Men) lives a quiet, monotonous life waiting hand-and-foot on her husband, Louie (David Denman) and her two adult sons. After an evening of birthday celebrations—she cleans, cooks and prepares the house for what turns out to be her own party—she notices a gift that strikes her interest: a jigsaw puzzle of a world map. Finishing the puzzle in record time, Agnes soon finds herself answering a "partner wanted" advertisement from puzzle champion Robert (Irrfan Khan, The Lunchbox; Life of Pi). As Agnes learns more about her gift at assembling the increasingly difficult puzzles Robert challenges her with, she also begins to give voice to her long-dormant desires.

    An adaptation of the 2009 Berlin Film Festival breakout hit of the same name from Argentina, Puzzle provides a sweet-natured glimpse into the complex interiority of what appears to be an entirely unremarkable life. Macdonald delivers a striking performance as Agnes, hinting at a deep longing for expression hidden beneath a lifetime of restraint. Puzzle asks us to consider what we might discover about ourselves if we allow that first spark of curiosity to ignite passion, courage and a little stubborn determination.

    "From its first elegantly shot frame, you know Puzzle is going to be something special. Turtletaub (...) ends Puzzle on such a delightful note of simplicity, that this near-perfect movie nevertheless stuns." (Jordan Ruimy, The Playlist)

    "Puzzle toes a tough line, managing to stay relentlessly good-hearted and deeply humane, even as Agnes herself plunges into deeper, more dramatic waters. It's the kind of mid-life crisis story that so rarely centers on a woman and Macdonald shines in the role, riveting even in the quietest of moments." (Kate Erbland, IndieWire)

    "It's a testament to Macdonald's performance (and later, to Khan's charm) that we share her passion for puzzling." (Wendy Ide, Screen International)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050