2-Week Calendar

Printable Version

December 10 - 16

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday
  • RECREATION

    Night of Adventure

December 17 - 23

  • Sunday
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
  • Saturday

ALL UPCOMING EVENTS

  • MUSIC
    Gentlemen's Christmas Event
    Saturday December 23, 3:00p–5:00p
    Presented by Gentlemen's Chorus
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $5 Plus Items for the Food Bank

    Tickets: Chorus Members and At the Door on the 23rd.

    Gentlemen's Chorus Christmas Concert & Carol Sing
    Lots of Audience Singing of Familiar Carols
    Two Children's Sets
    Special Selections from the Chorus

    Contact: miamezzo@hotmail.com  |  902-542-2723

  • CINEMA
    Lucky
    Sunday January 7, 4:00p–5:28p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Having outdrank, outsmoked, and outlived all of his contemporaries in his off-the-map desert town, fiercely independent 90-year-old atheist Lucky (the late Harry Dean Stanton in his final role) finds himself unexpectedly thrust into a late-in-life journey of self-exploration. The directorial debut of acclaimed character actor John Carroll Lynch (Jackie), Lucky is a cinematic love letter to its legendary leading man Stanton, as well as a deeply felt meditation on mortality, loneliness, spirituality and human connection.

    Living alone in the blistering Arizona heat, Lucky (Stanton; Seven Psychopaths) slopes along through life, occupying his time by smoking, drinking coffee, doing crosswords and walking around the dusty streets of his speck of a southwestern town. Unmoved by sentimentality and small talk, Lucky engages himself and those around him in mild ruminations on life, its value, and what it all might mean. Never maudlin but always poignant, Stanton’s gently powerful performance resonates even more in the wake of his passing this fall. A worthy final role, which evokes the simultaneous magnitude and futility of the daily details scattered throughout life, Lucky makes for an incredible showcase for Stanton’s unique mastery of the wry, cantankerous wisdom that became his trademark.

    "It's the humblest deep movie of recent years, a work in the same vein as American marginalia like Stranger Than Paradise and Trees Lounge, but with its own rhythm and color, its own emotional temperature, its own reasons for revealing and concealing things." (Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com)

    "It's a striking debut, and the kind of outing that will invariably leave audiences wanting to see more from Lynch behind the camera in the future. But Lucky is a showcase for Stanton above all things." (Dominick Suzanne-Mayer, Consequence of Sound)

    "If only every actor we loved could leave us with a farewell film like this one." (Stephanie Zacharek, Time)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Lucky
    Sunday January 7, 7:00p–8:28p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Having outdrank, outsmoked, and outlived all of his contemporaries in his off-the-map desert town, fiercely independent 90-year-old atheist Lucky (the late Harry Dean Stanton in his final role) finds himself unexpectedly thrust into a late-in-life journey of self-exploration. The directorial debut of acclaimed character actor John Carroll Lynch (Jackie), Lucky is a cinematic love letter to its legendary leading man Stanton, as well as a deeply felt meditation on mortality, loneliness, spirituality and human connection.

    Living alone in the blistering Arizona heat, Lucky (Stanton; Seven Psychopaths) slopes along through life, occupying his time by smoking, drinking coffee, doing crosswords and walking around the dusty streets of his speck of a southwestern town. Unmoved by sentimentality and small talk, Lucky engages himself and those around him in mild ruminations on life, its value, and what it all might mean. Never maudlin but always poignant, Stanton’s gently powerful performance resonates even more in the wake of his passing this fall. A worthy final role, which evokes the simultaneous magnitude and futility of the daily details scattered throughout life, Lucky makes for an incredible showcase for Stanton’s unique mastery of the wry, cantankerous wisdom that became his trademark.

    "It's the humblest deep movie of recent years, a work in the same vein as American marginalia like Stranger Than Paradise and Trees Lounge, but with its own rhythm and color, its own emotional temperature, its own reasons for revealing and concealing things." (Matt Zoller Seitz, RogerEbert.com)

    "It's a striking debut, and the kind of outing that will invariably leave audiences wanting to see more from Lynch behind the camera in the future. But Lucky is a showcase for Stanton above all things." (Dominick Suzanne-Mayer, Consequence of Sound)

    "If only every actor we loved could leave us with a farewell film like this one." (Stephanie Zacharek, Time)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Wonder
    Sunday January 14, 4:00p–5:53p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    "Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay; Burn Your Maps, Room), the central character in Stephen Chbosky's Wonder, is a brainy 10-year-old boy with a sweet high voice and a congenital facial deformity, whom numerous corrective surgeries have left looking like a cherub after a car accident. His left eye tugs downward as if a teardrop were falling from it; his ears are bulbs of flesh, and his face is framed by a pinkish ring of scar tissue. That said, he’s not the Phantom of the Opera. He’s just an ordinary kid whose looks take a bit of getting used to.

    Auggie has been home-schooled by his mother, Isabel (Julia Roberts), in their cozy Brooklyn brownstone. But now that he’s 10, she and Auggie’s dad, Nate (Owen Wilson; The Grand Budapest Hotel, Midnight in Paris), have made the decision to send him to middle school. They know they can’t shield him from the world forever, and they have no desire to.

    Roberts and Wilson make a compelling team; they play the Pullmans as supremely sensitive, loving parents who have the occasional tug-of-war spat about what’s best for their special son. Yet both want him to stand up for himself, and to be part of a community. Auggie wants that, too, though the kids he meets at Beecher Prep School don’t make it easy. By the end of his first day there, he has already been nicknamed (after one of his favorite Star Wars characters) 'Barf Hideous,' and he chops off the rat-tail braid that’s his only fashion statement—a testament to the destructive power of peer pressure. Just enough of the kids treat Auggie like a freak to make the belief that he is one tough for him to shake.

    Movies about people with dramatic disfigurements run a high risk of being mawkish and manipulative. Yet maybe because the dangers of grotesque sentimentality loom so large, a handful of filmmakers, over the years, have made a point of taking on stories like this one and treading carefully around the pitfalls. David Lynch did it in The Elephant Man, his shrewdly restrained, underbelly-of-London Gothic horror weeper, which revealed John Merrick, beneath his warped and bubbled flesh, to be a figure of entrancing delicacy. Peter Bogdanovich did it in Mask, his straight-up tale of a teenager with a face of scowling strangeness who came to embrace the person he was.

    Wonder, adapted from R.J. Palacio’s 2012 novel, is a movie that belongs in their company. It’s a very tasteful heart-tugger—a drama of disarmingly level-headed empathy that glides along with wit, assurance, and grace, and has something touching and resonant to say about the current climate of American bullying. At the same time, the film never upsets the apple cart of conventionality. Wonder is an honest feel-good movie, but it lacks the pricklier edges of art." (Owen Gleiberman, Variety)

    "Much of the film's success does reside upon Chbosky's mostly restrained execution, but it is Tremblay that carries it. His fully rendered and exceptional performance is something of a miracle as it joyously goes past the prosthetics and into the core of his character's roller coaster of emotions." (Jordan Ruimy, The Film Stage)

    "Giving the film credit where it's due, Wonder never cheats in its pursuit of emotion. It's never mawkish of manipulative, and its characters are so well-established both in the writing and in the performances that the movie ultimately does the hard work of earning those damp Kleenexes." (Alonso Duralde, The Wrap)

     

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Wonder
    Sunday January 14, 7:00p–8:53p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    "Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay; Burn Your Maps, Room), the central character in Stephen Chbosky's Wonder, is a brainy 10-year-old boy with a sweet high voice and a congenital facial deformity, whom numerous corrective surgeries have left looking like a cherub after a car accident. His left eye tugs downward as if a teardrop were falling from it; his ears are bulbs of flesh, and his face is framed by a pinkish ring of scar tissue. That said, he’s not the Phantom of the Opera. He’s just an ordinary kid whose looks take a bit of getting used to.

    Auggie has been home-schooled by his mother, Isabel (Julia Roberts), in their cozy Brooklyn brownstone. But now that he’s 10, she and Auggie’s dad, Nate (Owen Wilson; The Grand Budapest Hotel, Midnight in Paris), have made the decision to send him to middle school. They know they can’t shield him from the world forever, and they have no desire to.

    Roberts and Wilson make a compelling team; they play the Pullmans as supremely sensitive, loving parents who have the occasional tug-of-war spat about what’s best for their special son. Yet both want him to stand up for himself, and to be part of a community. Auggie wants that, too, though the kids he meets at Beecher Prep School don’t make it easy. By the end of his first day there, he has already been nicknamed (after one of his favorite Star Wars characters) 'Barf Hideous,' and he chops off the rat-tail braid that’s his only fashion statement—a testament to the destructive power of peer pressure. Just enough of the kids treat Auggie like a freak to make the belief that he is one tough for him to shake.

    Movies about people with dramatic disfigurements run a high risk of being mawkish and manipulative. Yet maybe because the dangers of grotesque sentimentality loom so large, a handful of filmmakers, over the years, have made a point of taking on stories like this one and treading carefully around the pitfalls. David Lynch did it in The Elephant Man, his shrewdly restrained, underbelly-of-London Gothic horror weeper, which revealed John Merrick, beneath his warped and bubbled flesh, to be a figure of entrancing delicacy. Peter Bogdanovich did it in Mask, his straight-up tale of a teenager with a face of scowling strangeness who came to embrace the person he was.

    Wonder, adapted from R.J. Palacio’s 2012 novel, is a movie that belongs in their company. It’s a very tasteful heart-tugger—a drama of disarmingly level-headed empathy that glides along with wit, assurance, and grace, and has something touching and resonant to say about the current climate of American bullying. At the same time, the film never upsets the apple cart of conventionality. Wonder is an honest feel-good movie, but it lacks the pricklier edges of art." (Owen Gleiberman, Variety)

    "Much of the film's success does reside upon Chbosky's mostly restrained execution, but it is Tremblay that carries it. His fully rendered and exceptional performance is something of a miracle as it joyously goes past the prosthetics and into the core of his character's roller coaster of emotions." (Jordan Ruimy, The Film Stage)

    "Giving the film credit where it's due, Wonder never cheats in its pursuit of emotion. It's never mawkish of manipulative, and its characters are so well-established both in the writing and in the performances that the movie ultimately does the hard work of earning those damp Kleenexes." (Alonso Duralde, The Wrap)

     

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Don’t Talk to Irene
    Wednesday January 17, 7:00p–8:30p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Irene Willis (Michelle McLeod) lives in a town deemed the most insignificant geographical location in North America. The cycle of life is predictable and bland, something 15-year-old Irene, "the fattest girl in high school," might just be able to shake up. Fuelled by the dream of becoming a cheerleader, but constantly told by both her overprotective mother and society that she is not exactly a fit for the role, Irene turns to her confidante and all-around god: Geena Davis. Speaking to Irene via the A League of Their Own poster on her bedroom wall, Geena provides the inspiration and tough no-nonsense motivation she needs to face her bullies and follow her passions.

    When Irene gets suspended and is forced to do community service at a retirement home—run by discipline freak Barrett (Scott Thompson)—alongside her bullies and her new friend, Tesh (a gender non-conforming, glitzy dreamer), an opportunity arises. If she cannot be a high-school cheerleader, maybe she can turn her new-found circle of elderly friends into an unlikely dance troupe.

    Pat Mills established himself with his dark comedy Guidance and brings to Don't Talk to Irene his smart, sly, and sharp humour. This is an empowering comedy about acceptance on your own terms. Disarmingly honest, Irene goes through the world with no filter, quick repartee, and an underlying sense of potential achievement. She just needs a bit of a lift to soar. You go, girl!

    "From first tentative rehearsals to road trip, you can see where the 'let's put on a show' gumption is going. But the newly empowered teenage choreographer and her ragtag troupe ride their own giddy momentum." (Sheri Linden, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "There's a warm-hearted tale here suffused with wit and a positive and life-affirming message about having the confidence to achieve your goals in the face of adversity." (Bruce Demara, Toronto Star)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Novitiate
    Sunday January 21, 4:00p–6:03p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Unable to find her place at home or amongst her peers at school, Cathleen (Margaret Qualley) finds sol­stice with the nuns at her school and decides to turn to the Catholic Church to find meaning in her life. However, her place in the Church is complicated as larger changes are on the horizon from the Vatican.

    After her mother, Nora Harris (Julianne Nicholson), decides she should have some idea of what religion is about, Cathleen is immediately struck by the peace and calm that she experiences attending her first Catholic mass. Despite the misgivings of her decidedly irreligious mother (an anomaly in their small 1960s Tennessee town), Cathleen wholeheartedly pursues her newfound interest in God, which provides her with the intellectual stimulation and calm sense of security she is missing in her tense home.

    Sure of her devotion, Cathleen dedicates herself to becoming a nun and joins a local convent, isolated from her family and the life she once knew. Encouraged by the cama­raderie with her fellow postulants and the peaceful silence of her initial training under Sister Mary Grace (Dianna Agron, TV’s Glee), Cathleen moves forward with her training as a novitiate. However, as the Catholic Church finds itself on the verge of momentous change and her preparations increase in severity—bringing her in closer contact with the austere and demanding Reverend Mother (Melissa Leo, Prisoners; The Fighter)—Cathleen is forced to decide if the convent and her rela­tionship with God can give her everything she needs.

    Supported by outstanding performances, Margaret Betts presents an assured and beau­tifully captured feature debut, winner of the Breakthrough Director Award at Sundance 2017. Her skillful and nuanced exploration of the pressures facing young Cathleen brings a palpable kindness and universality to her story.

    "Both introspective and entertaining, Betts never forgets that her young nuns are still teenage girls, and Novitiate rings as true as any other film about coming of age." (Kate Erbland, Indiewire)

    "This arresting work (...) mesmerizes as it probes a uniquely female-dominated milieu where passions—both religious, sexual and a combination of the two—run hot under those starched, lily-white coils and black habits." (Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "Novitiate sure-handedly takes us inside the world of belief with care, concern and a piercing, discerning eye." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Novitiate
    Sunday January 21, 7:00p–9:03p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Unable to find her place at home or amongst her peers at school, Cathleen (Margaret Qualley) finds sol­stice with the nuns at her school and decides to turn to the Catholic Church to find meaning in her life. However, her place in the Church is complicated as larger changes are on the horizon from the Vatican.

    After her mother, Nora Harris (Julianne Nicholson), decides she should have some idea of what religion is about, Cathleen is immediately struck by the peace and calm that she experiences attending her first Catholic mass. Despite the misgivings of her decidedly irreligious mother (an anomaly in their small 1960s Tennessee town), Cathleen wholeheartedly pursues her newfound interest in God, which provides her with the intellectual stimulation and calm sense of security she is missing in her tense home.

    Sure of her devotion, Cathleen dedicates herself to becoming a nun and joins a local convent, isolated from her family and the life she once knew. Encouraged by the cama­raderie with her fellow postulants and the peaceful silence of her initial training under Sister Mary Grace (Dianna Agron, TV’s Glee), Cathleen moves forward with her training as a novitiate. However, as the Catholic Church finds itself on the verge of momentous change and her preparations increase in severity—bringing her in closer contact with the austere and demanding Reverend Mother (Melissa Leo, Prisoners; The Fighter)—Cathleen is forced to decide if the convent and her rela­tionship with God can give her everything she needs.

    Supported by outstanding performances, Margaret Betts presents an assured and beau­tifully captured feature debut, winner of the Breakthrough Director Award at Sundance 2017. Her skillful and nuanced exploration of the pressures facing young Cathleen brings a palpable kindness and universality to her story.

    "Both introspective and entertaining, Betts never forgets that her young nuns are still teenage girls, and Novitiate rings as true as any other film about coming of age." (Kate Erbland, Indiewire)

    "This arresting work (...) mesmerizes as it probes a uniquely female-dominated milieu where passions—both religious, sexual and a combination of the two—run hot under those starched, lily-white coils and black habits." (Leslie Felperin, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "Novitiate sure-handedly takes us inside the world of belief with care, concern and a piercing, discerning eye." (Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Banff Mountain Film Festival
    Tuesday January 23, 7:00p–10:00p
    Presented by The Trail Shop
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $20 (inclusive of Tax)

    Tickets: The Box of Delights Book Store 466 Main St, Wolfville, NS, B4P 1E2 (902) 542-9511

    This years best and boldest mountain sports and adventure movies from our friends at The Banff Centre!

    Contact: boxofdelightsbooks@gmail.com  |  (902) 542-9511

  • CINEMA
    Human Flow
    Wednesday January 24, 7:00p–9:20p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change and war in the greatest human displacement since World War II. Human Flow, an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, gives a powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact.

    Captured over the course of an eventful year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent human stories that stretches across the globe in countries including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Greece, Germany, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Mexico and Turkey. Human Flow is a witness to its subjects and their desperate search for safety, shelter and justice: from teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings to barbed-wire borders; from dislocation and disillusionment to courage, endurance and adaptation; from the haunting lure of lives left behind to the unknown potential of the future. Human Flow comes at a crucial time when tolerance, compassion and trust are needed more than ever. This visceral work of cinema is a testament to the unassailable human spirit and poses one of the questions that will define this century: Will our global society emerge from fear, isolation, and self-interest and choose a path of openness, freedom, and respect for humanity?

    "Human Flow is an epic portrait of mass migration that understands how a lack of empathy often stems from a failure of imagination." (David Ehrlich, Indiewire)

    "Human Flow is rooted in specific current national and political situations, yet it offers a portrait of forced human movement and suffering that feels almost timeless." (Dave Calhoun, Time Out)

    "This is an urgent, deep soak in the current refugee crisis." (Jordan Hoffman, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    C’est la vie (Le sens de la fête)
    Sunday January 28, 4:00p–5:57p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    This effervescent comedy from celebrated French directing duo Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano (Intouchables) invites us to an opulent château to attend a très extravagant wedding, where the groom is an obnoxious tyrant, the band is at war with the organizers and the chief planner is looking for the exit.

    Max (Jean-Pierre Bacri) is a battle-weary veteran of the wedding-planning racket. His latest—and last—gig is a hell of a fête, involving stuffy period costumes for the caterers, a vain, hyper- sensitive singer who thinks he is a Gallic James Brown and a morose, micromanaging groom determined to make Max's night as miserable as possible. But what makes the affair too bitter to endure is that Max's colleague and ostensible girlfriend, Joisette (Suzanne Clément, Guibord s'en va-t-en guerre, Mommy), seems to have written him off, coolly going about her professional duties while openly flirting with a much younger server. It is going to be a very long night… especially once the groom's aerial serenade gets underway.

    An ensemble work brimming with offbeat, lovable characters and hilarious set pieces, C'est la vie! is a fiendishly smart, sprawling comedy as only the French do it. You will be laughing all the way down the aisle.

    “This is an expertly assembled, tartly played and hugely enjoyable romp.” (Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    C’est la vie (Le sens de la fête)
    Sunday January 28, 7:00p–8:57p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    This effervescent comedy from celebrated French directing duo Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano (Intouchables) invites us to an opulent château to attend a très extravagant wedding, where the groom is an obnoxious tyrant, the band is at war with the organizers and the chief planner is looking for the exit.

    Max (Jean-Pierre Bacri) is a battle-weary veteran of the wedding-planning racket. His latest—and last—gig is a hell of a fête, involving stuffy period costumes for the caterers, a vain, hyper- sensitive singer who thinks he is a Gallic James Brown and a morose, micromanaging groom determined to make Max's night as miserable as possible. But what makes the affair too bitter to endure is that Max's colleague and ostensible girlfriend, Joisette (Suzanne Clément, Guibord s'en va-t-en guerre, Mommy), seems to have written him off, coolly going about her professional duties while openly flirting with a much younger server. It is going to be a very long night… especially once the groom's aerial serenade gets underway.

    An ensemble work brimming with offbeat, lovable characters and hilarious set pieces, C'est la vie! is a fiendishly smart, sprawling comedy as only the French do it. You will be laughing all the way down the aisle.

    “This is an expertly assembled, tartly played and hugely enjoyable romp.” (Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Wonderstruck
    Sunday February 4, 4:00p–5:57p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Director Todd Haynes (Carol, I'm Not There) returns with this beautifully rendered, semi-silent adaptation from the critically acclaimed 2011 novel of the same name by writer-illustrator Brian Selznick, who also wrote the screenplay.

    In 1927, a young girl runs away from home in New Jersey and makes her way to Manhattan, hoping to find someone who was an important part of her past. Fifty years later, a deaf boy befallen by personal tragedy finds a clue about his family that leads him to run away from rural Minnesota to New York. As their adventures lead them to strange new places, where mysteries about themselves and the world seem to lurk around every corner, their stories of discovery reach across years of silence and regret, and find each other through a mesmerizing symmetry driven by wonder and hope.

    For Rose (Millicent Simmonds), life under the strict control of her father is typical for a deaf child of her era, kept out of public view with little connection to the world outside of her beloved scrapbook, an elaborate, living work of art dedicated mostly to the career of an actress, Lilian Mayhew (Julianne Moore; Maggie's Plan, Still Alice). When Mayhew comes to New York to open up a new play, Rose manages to find her way into Manhattan, hoping to connect to the silent movie star. For lifelong Minnesotan Ben (Oakes Fegley), his deafness is recent, the result of a freak accident that occurred shortly after the loss of his mother, free-spirited Elaine (Michelle Williams; Manchester by the Sea, Suite Française). Sorting through her things, he finds a clue about his unknown father—a souvenir book from New York City. He boards a bus, unbeknownst to his bereft aunt, and eventually arrives in Manhattan.

    For both young people, their inability to hear and communicate (neither know sign language) makes their quest in the big city fraught with excitement and danger. Their simple goals quickly turn complex as the chaos and confusion of city streets derail them. Despite their maturity and determination, they are easily overwhelmed and reluctant to seek help. Both wind up seeking solace at the American Museum of Natural History, where new and old friends join them in confronting the questions that Rose and Ben so desperately need answered.

    "Alive with the magic of pictures and the mysteries of silence, this is an uncommonly grownup film about children, communication, connection and memory." (David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "Wonderstruck is a visually striking film that's uncompromising in its approach—less about narrative momentum than about surrendering to the power of images." (Calvin Wilson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

    "The performances, including a sweetly sincere and easygoing turn from the deaf actress Simmonds, become the audience's way into Wonderstruck." (Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Wonderstruck
    Sunday February 4, 7:00p–8:57p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Director Todd Haynes (Carol, I'm Not There) returns with this beautifully rendered, semi-silent adaptation from the critically acclaimed 2011 novel of the same name by writer-illustrator Brian Selznick, who also wrote the screenplay.

    In 1927, a young girl runs away from home in New Jersey and makes her way to Manhattan, hoping to find someone who was an important part of her past. Fifty years later, a deaf boy befallen by personal tragedy finds a clue about his family that leads him to run away from rural Minnesota to New York. As their adventures lead them to strange new places, where mysteries about themselves and the world seem to lurk around every corner, their stories of discovery reach across years of silence and regret, and find each other through a mesmerizing symmetry driven by wonder and hope.

    For Rose (Millicent Simmonds), life under the strict control of her father is typical for a deaf child of her era, kept out of public view with little connection to the world outside of her beloved scrapbook, an elaborate, living work of art dedicated mostly to the career of an actress, Lilian Mayhew (Julianne Moore; Maggie's Plan, Still Alice). When Mayhew comes to New York to open up a new play, Rose manages to find her way into Manhattan, hoping to connect to the silent movie star. For lifelong Minnesotan Ben (Oakes Fegley), his deafness is recent, the result of a freak accident that occurred shortly after the loss of his mother, free-spirited Elaine (Michelle Williams; Manchester by the Sea, Suite Française). Sorting through her things, he finds a clue about his unknown father—a souvenir book from New York City. He boards a bus, unbeknownst to his bereft aunt, and eventually arrives in Manhattan.

    For both young people, their inability to hear and communicate (neither know sign language) makes their quest in the big city fraught with excitement and danger. Their simple goals quickly turn complex as the chaos and confusion of city streets derail them. Despite their maturity and determination, they are easily overwhelmed and reluctant to seek help. Both wind up seeking solace at the American Museum of Natural History, where new and old friends join them in confronting the questions that Rose and Ben so desperately need answered.

    "Alive with the magic of pictures and the mysteries of silence, this is an uncommonly grownup film about children, communication, connection and memory." (David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "Wonderstruck is a visually striking film that's uncompromising in its approach—less about narrative momentum than about surrendering to the power of images." (Calvin Wilson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

    "The performances, including a sweetly sincere and easygoing turn from the deaf actress Simmonds, become the audience's way into Wonderstruck." (Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    The Square
    Wednesday February 7, 7:00p–9:22p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Swedish provocateur Ruben Östlund, the director of Force Majeure, returns with The Square, one of his most audacious pieces to date and winner of the prestigious Palme d’Or at Cannes. A spot-on, no-holds-barred satire of the more vapid foibles of the postmodern art world, the film follows Christian (Claes Bang), the imperious, self-centred, and hopelessly befuddled curator of Sweden’s most cutting-edge art museum. Christian’s attempts to promote his exhibits are deflected by personal misfortunes and culminate with a less than successful online campaign designed by two twenty-something chuckleheads who have been inhaling even more rarefied air than Christian.

    The Square is full of brilliant and dazzling set pieces, including an onstage interview gone horribly awry and a performance piece gone even more horribly wrong (in possibly the year’s most indelible onscreen moment).

    Östlund refuses to score easy points, outlining the challenges that face artists trying to examine the increasingly complex and absurd world we live in and dealing with the privileged (and often borderline hostile) members of the audience who consider art only as a social statement or financial investment.

    One of the most undaunted examples of the comedy of extreme discomfort and social collapse, The Square is worthy of the great Spanish surrealist Luis Buñuel or Östlund’s mentor, Roy Andersson.

    "The Square means to send you out of the theater arguing, and its success on that front should not eclipse its more lasting, unsettling achievement. It affirms that art, this movie very much included, can tell us things about ourselves that we'd prefer not to know." (Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times)

    "This is a movie with a lot on its mind, from art to altruism to the so-called bystander effect, and it could function as a Rorschach test for its audience, reflecting viewers' anxieties and insecurities right back at them. It's also just really, really funny, at least for those who can find humor in humiliation." (A.A. Dowd, The A.V. Club)

    "Swedish writer-director Ruben Östlund takes modern society’s temperature and finds it dangerously overheated in the madly ambitious and frequently disquieting The Square." (Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Toivon tuolla puolen (The Other Side of Hope)
    Sunday February 11, 4:00p–5:40p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Returning with his first feature in six years since his Film Circuit arthouse favourite Le Havre, Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki (The Man Without a Past) delivers what can be considered the second chapter of his Port Cities Trilogy. In his distinctive anachronistic, yet tonally rich style, Kaurismäki paints the unlikely bond between a Syrian refugee and a middle-aged menswear salesman.

    Khaled (newcomer Sherwan Haji) worked as a mechanic in Aleppo before fleeing in a coal ship container and accidently landing on the shores of Helsinki. He emerges from his hid­ing place covered head to toe in black dust, an alien in an unfamiliar town. Wikstrom (Sakari Kuosmanen, The Man without a Past), deeply unsatisfied with his life, leaves his prickly, alcoholic wife and offloads his remaining stock of men’s shirts to fund a career change. After taking a risk at a high-stakes poker game, Wikstrom is presented with a new breath of life that eventually connects and collides both men in an unpredictable friendship.

    Winner of the Silver Bear for Best Director at 2017's Berlinale, The Other Side of Hope demonstrates the height of Kaurismäki’s auteurial form. Deftly mixing tragedy and wry humour, Kaurismäki builds a story of an unlikely community coming together under difficult circumstances. This idiosyncratic fable on the refugee crisis could not be more humane and timely.

    "Hope is as contemporary and vital a film as you're likely to find in 2017, but it's also one of the funniest and most classically (not to mention beautifully) cinematic too." (Rory O'Connor, The Film Stage)

    "It's a deeply humane film, as well as a quietly hilarious one." (Dave Calhoun, Time Out London)

    "This is a world that reeks of cigarette smoke and cheap vodka, yet as always in the work of Finland's maestro of droll melancholy, the perfume that lingers longest is empathy." (David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Toivon tuolla puolen (The Other Side of Hope)
    Sunday February 11, 7:00p–8:40p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Returning with his first feature in six years since his Film Circuit arthouse favourite Le Havre, Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki (The Man Without a Past) delivers what can be considered the second chapter of his Port Cities Trilogy. In his distinctive anachronistic, yet tonally rich style, Kaurismäki paints the unlikely bond between a Syrian refugee and a middle-aged menswear salesman.

    Khaled (newcomer Sherwan Haji) worked as a mechanic in Aleppo before fleeing in a coal ship container and accidently landing on the shores of Helsinki. He emerges from his hid­ing place covered head to toe in black dust, an alien in an unfamiliar town. Wikstrom (Sakari Kuosmanen, The Man without a Past), deeply unsatisfied with his life, leaves his prickly, alcoholic wife and offloads his remaining stock of men’s shirts to fund a career change. After taking a risk at a high-stakes poker game, Wikstrom is presented with a new breath of life that eventually connects and collides both men in an unpredictable friendship.

    Winner of the Silver Bear for Best Director at 2017's Berlinale, The Other Side of Hope demonstrates the height of Kaurismäki’s auteurial form. Deftly mixing tragedy and wry humour, Kaurismäki builds a story of an unlikely community coming together under difficult circumstances. This idiosyncratic fable on the refugee crisis could not be more humane and timely.

    "Hope is as contemporary and vital a film as you're likely to find in 2017, but it's also one of the funniest and most classically (not to mention beautifully) cinematic too." (Rory O'Connor, The Film Stage)

    "It's a deeply humane film, as well as a quietly hilarious one." (Dave Calhoun, Time Out London)

    "This is a world that reeks of cigarette smoke and cheap vodka, yet as always in the work of Finland's maestro of droll melancholy, the perfume that lingers longest is empathy." (David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    The Florida Project
    Sunday February 18, 4:00p–5:51p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In his highly anticipated follow-up to the award-winning Tangerine, filmmaker Sean Baker makes a sincere but wholly unsentimental foray into a community living on the margins of American society. In the process, we encounter two of the most unforgettable characters in the cinema this year: 22-year-old Halley (Bria Vinaite), and her six-year-old daughter, Moonee (Brooklynn Prince).

    Halley and Moonee live in a cheap motel near an Orlando freeway, a stone's throw from a cartoon-inspired theme park. That park—and every piece of mythology, consumerism, and fantasy it represents—might as well be on Mars for this mother and daughter, as Halley struggles to keep menial jobs to put a $35-a-night roof over their heads and sugary cereal on the table. Although her mother grapples with impulse control and a sad bewilderment at her chaotic life, Moonee grabs every day by the tail, corralling her pals from the next motel over to explore abandoned buildings, grift ice cream, and exuberantly prank the motel staff, most notably the ever-patient Bobby (Willem Dafoe, The Grand Budapest Hotel). When life takes a further downward spiral, Moonee's defiant, no-holds-barred love for her mother defines her uncertain future.

    Baker's immersive examination of lives lived in the shadow of a fantasy world holds no clichéd, feel-good lessons about love or families. Instead, it boldly takes us to a place where momentary joys, a mother's devotion, and a spirited girl called Moonee can find a home.

    "An astonishingly fine movie about the vagaries and frolics of childhood as seen largely through the eyes of its pint-sized protagonists." (Peter Rainer, Christian Science Monitor)

    "This movie accomplishes something almost miraculous—two things actually. It casts a spell and tells the truth." (A.O. Scott, The New York Times)

    "It's that honesty that makes The Florida Project so powerful. This is a remarkable film, one of the best of the year." (Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com)

    "The Florida Project won't let us look away. Nor, given its brilliance, would we want to. Instead, we laugh, we watch silently, and we're challenged to stop simplifying people's lives so we can offer easy theoretical answers." (Alissa Wilkinson, Vox)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    The Florida Project
    Sunday February 18, 7:00p–8:51p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In his highly anticipated follow-up to the award-winning Tangerine, filmmaker Sean Baker makes a sincere but wholly unsentimental foray into a community living on the margins of American society. In the process, we encounter two of the most unforgettable characters in the cinema this year: 22-year-old Halley (Bria Vinaite), and her six-year-old daughter, Moonee (Brooklynn Prince).

    Halley and Moonee live in a cheap motel near an Orlando freeway, a stone's throw from a cartoon-inspired theme park. That park—and every piece of mythology, consumerism, and fantasy it represents—might as well be on Mars for this mother and daughter, as Halley struggles to keep menial jobs to put a $35-a-night roof over their heads and sugary cereal on the table. Although her mother grapples with impulse control and a sad bewilderment at her chaotic life, Moonee grabs every day by the tail, corralling her pals from the next motel over to explore abandoned buildings, grift ice cream, and exuberantly prank the motel staff, most notably the ever-patient Bobby (Willem Dafoe, The Grand Budapest Hotel). When life takes a further downward spiral, Moonee's defiant, no-holds-barred love for her mother defines her uncertain future.

    Baker's immersive examination of lives lived in the shadow of a fantasy world holds no clichéd, feel-good lessons about love or families. Instead, it boldly takes us to a place where momentary joys, a mother's devotion, and a spirited girl called Moonee can find a home.

    "An astonishingly fine movie about the vagaries and frolics of childhood as seen largely through the eyes of its pint-sized protagonists." (Peter Rainer, Christian Science Monitor)

    "This movie accomplishes something almost miraculous—two things actually. It casts a spell and tells the truth." (A.O. Scott, The New York Times)

    "It's that honesty that makes The Florida Project so powerful. This is a remarkable film, one of the best of the year." (Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com)

    "The Florida Project won't let us look away. Nor, given its brilliance, would we want to. Instead, we laugh, we watch silently, and we're challenged to stop simplifying people's lives so we can offer easy theoretical answers." (Alissa Wilkinson, Vox)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    The Breadwinner
    Wednesday February 21, 7:00p–8:34p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Based on the award-winning, best-selling young adult novel of the same name by Deborah Ellis, The Breadwinner tells the remarkable story of Parvana, a young girl who is forced to become the breadwinner for her family while living under the Taliban regime. Executive produced by Angelina Jolie and helmed by Irish filmmaker Nora Twomey in her solo directorial debut (co-director on The Secret of Kells, head of story and voice director on Song of the Sea), The Breadwinner is a rare gem that will captivate both young and mature audiences.

    Living in a single room of a bombed-out apartment building in Kabul, 11-year-old Parvana is not allowed to attend school or leave the house without a male chaperone. Her father—a history teacher until his school was bombed and his health destroyed—sits on a blanket in the marketplace, reading letters for people who cannot read or write. However, when the Taliban arrests Parvana’s father for having a foreign education, the young girl disguises herself as a boy in order to shop for food and earn money for her family.

    Sumptuously rendered with swirling hand-drawn animation that has become the hallmark of Cartoon Saloon, the film cap­tures the colours, sights, and lights of the Afghan city. Featuring a voice cast of largely Afghani, Pakastani and Indian actors, The Breadwinner disrupts the typical Hollywood version of princesses. Instead, it is a timely reminder of the millions of strong young girls and women worldwide who persevere in the face of oppression or conflict.

    "The Breadwinner delivers a heart-wrenching coming-of-age tale within a nation that’s lost its way." (Jared Mobarak, The Film Stage)

    "Delighting in the ancient tradition of storytelling as a means of education and understanding as well as entertainment, Nora Twomey's The Breadwinner is a richly animated jewel." (Matthew Anderson, CineVue)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool
    Sunday February 25, 4:00p–5:45p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    The sultry Gloria Grahame (Annette Bening, 20th Century Women, The Kids Are All Right) won a best supporting actress Oscar for her performance in 1952's The Bad and the Beautiful. She appeared in films alongside Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Lana Turner, Kirk Douglas and a bevy of other icons. Her star blazed brightly then faded quickly, but she did not disappear. How Grahame spent her later years is the subject of this beautiful—and rare—ode to life after fame.

    Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool features as fine a performance as you will see this year: Annette Bening's portrayal of Grahame. She is paired brilliantly with Jamie Bell (Jane Eyre), who breathes pure empathy into his role as Gloria's lover Peter Turner, a working-class English actor. Drawing on Turner's memoir of the same name, director Paul McGuigan fashions a moving narrative that embraces the high and lows of the erstwhile Hollywood star's time spent living in Liverpool in the 1970s. Gloria is in her fifties but her vitality and eccentricity leave Peter, who is decades younger, enraptured by this outrageous new force in his life.

    As the two embark on their romance, we follow them from England to Los Angeles, from stage to hospital and from laughter to tears. Unorthodox and sincere, Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool is the kind of showbiz love story seldom depicted onscreen.

    "There is no denying the emotional force that this film develops, and for that, we can credit talented filmmakers and two stars working at the height of their powers." (Stephen Farber, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "It's a beguiling story and Bell and Bening are tremendous as the star-crossed lovers." (Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool
    Sunday February 25, 7:00p–8:45p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    The sultry Gloria Grahame (Annette Bening, 20th Century Women, The Kids Are All Right) won a best supporting actress Oscar for her performance in 1952's The Bad and the Beautiful. She appeared in films alongside Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Lana Turner, Kirk Douglas and a bevy of other icons. Her star blazed brightly then faded quickly, but she did not disappear. How Grahame spent her later years is the subject of this beautiful—and rare—ode to life after fame.

    Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool features as fine a performance as you will see this year: Annette Bening's portrayal of Grahame. She is paired brilliantly with Jamie Bell (Jane Eyre), who breathes pure empathy into his role as Gloria's lover Peter Turner, a working-class English actor. Drawing on Turner's memoir of the same name, director Paul McGuigan fashions a moving narrative that embraces the high and lows of the erstwhile Hollywood star's time spent living in Liverpool in the 1970s. Gloria is in her fifties but her vitality and eccentricity leave Peter, who is decades younger, enraptured by this outrageous new force in his life.

    As the two embark on their romance, we follow them from England to Los Angeles, from stage to hospital and from laughter to tears. Unorthodox and sincere, Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool is the kind of showbiz love story seldom depicted onscreen.

    "There is no denying the emotional force that this film develops, and for that, we can credit talented filmmakers and two stars working at the height of their powers." (Stephen Farber, The Hollywood Reporter)

    "It's a beguiling story and Bell and Bening are tremendous as the star-crossed lovers." (Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Visages, villages (Faces Places)
    Wednesday February 28, 7:00p–8:29p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    A treasure of global cinema, Agnès Varda (The Beaches of Agnes, The Gleaners and I) makes films alive with curiosity and playfulness. Now in her eighties, she is the world's most youthful filmmaker. Her latest nonfiction film is an inspired collaboration with JR, the mysterious French street artist. Like many of Varda's works, Faces Places is a kind of travelogue in which the wonder of each locale visited is only as potent as the populace whose existence affects it.

    The modus operandi is simple: Varda and JR roam from place to place in JR's truck, which is decorated to resemble a camera. In each place they visit, they meet people—coal miners, cheese makers, a Herculean farmer—and JR creates immense monochromatic portraits of them. Our endearing duo then affixes these portraits to various edifices. Quite literally, faces merge with places, or, to cite the film's original French title, visage merges with village. The landscape Varda and JR traverse becomes a record of encounters. The cumulative effect is transcendent.

    Among Faces Places' most amusing refrains is Varda's annoyance at JR's refusal to remove his sunglasses, which she says reminds her of Jean-Luc Godard in the '60s. Near the films' end Varda and JR actually pay a visit to Godard. The contrast between Varda's French New Wave cohort, who represents her tremendous six-decade legacy, and JR, who embodies her vibrant present, speaks volumes about the scope of this amazing auteur's durability and persistence of vision.

    "Faces Places is a film of sheer joy, its exuberance surpassed only by its tenderness and purity of purpose." (Ann Hornaday, Washington Post)

    "The film is an intensely personal record, yet also a universal contemplation. Faces Places leaves the viewer with a sense of the glories of images and communication—sometimes random, sometimes specific, always continual and cumulative." (Marjorie Baumgarten, Austin Chronicle)

    "Sheer perfection—that's the phrase that springs to mind when describing the humanist miracle that is Faces Places, the year's best and most beguiling documentary." (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Lady Bird
    Sunday March 4, 4:00p–5:34p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Christine McPherson (Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn)—affectionately known and self-proclaimed as Lady Bird—is an ambitious, bright, and precocious high school senior. Longing to break free of suburban Sacramento, she dreams of a different life full of east coast skyscrapers, Ivy League universities and cosmopolitan culture.

    With modest grades and no alumni connections to speak of, Lady Bird needs extracurriculars to beef up her college applications. Joining the drama club leads to new friends (sometimes at the expense of old ones), first loves and a social life in full swing. Dealing with her critical mother and succeeding at math do not come as easily. With her dad recently laid off, her mom working double shifts as a nurse, and her brother and his girlfriend—Berkeley grads—working at the supermarket, she is keenly aware that post–high school life is no walk in the park. Old enough to appreciate what she has, but not always mature enough to show it, sometimes she just wants to go shopping for her prom dress rather than putting her clothes away.

    Navigating the awkward space between adolescence and adulthood, Lady Bird, splendidly brought to life by Ronan, is a character to whom we can all relate. With her solo directorial debut, Greta Gerwig continues the charm and wit of her previous screenwriting work—think Frances Ha and Mistress America but with a more sophisticated approach to character and interpersonal relationships. Incredibly personal and immensely relatable, Lady Bird is sure to be one of the defining coming-of-age films of its generation.

    "Despite hitting so many classic coming-of-age hallmarks, Lady Bird never feels anything but fresh (and refreshing). This is, in part, due to the film's remarkably realistic performances." (Sarah Kurchak, Consequence of Sound)

    "A lovingly observed, pitch perfect coming-of-age comedy, Gerwig's warm, astute account of the end of adolescence is a stunning solo debut." (Christopher Machell, CineVue)

    "A sweet, deeply personal portrayal of female adolescence that's more attuned to the bonds between best girlfriends than casual flings with boys, writer-director Greta Gerwig's beautiful Lady Bird flutters with the attractively loose rhythms of youth." (Tomris Laffly, Time Out New York)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Lady Bird
    Sunday March 4, 7:00p–8:34p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Christine McPherson (Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn)—affectionately known and self-proclaimed as Lady Bird—is an ambitious, bright, and precocious high school senior. Longing to break free of suburban Sacramento, she dreams of a different life full of east coast skyscrapers, Ivy League universities and cosmopolitan culture.

    With modest grades and no alumni connections to speak of, Lady Bird needs extracurriculars to beef up her college applications. Joining the drama club leads to new friends (sometimes at the expense of old ones), first loves and a social life in full swing. Dealing with her critical mother and succeeding at math do not come as easily. With her dad recently laid off, her mom working double shifts as a nurse, and her brother and his girlfriend—Berkeley grads—working at the supermarket, she is keenly aware that post–high school life is no walk in the park. Old enough to appreciate what she has, but not always mature enough to show it, sometimes she just wants to go shopping for her prom dress rather than putting her clothes away.

    Navigating the awkward space between adolescence and adulthood, Lady Bird, splendidly brought to life by Ronan, is a character to whom we can all relate. With her solo directorial debut, Greta Gerwig continues the charm and wit of her previous screenwriting work—think Frances Ha and Mistress America but with a more sophisticated approach to character and interpersonal relationships. Incredibly personal and immensely relatable, Lady Bird is sure to be one of the defining coming-of-age films of its generation.

    "Despite hitting so many classic coming-of-age hallmarks, Lady Bird never feels anything but fresh (and refreshing). This is, in part, due to the film's remarkably realistic performances." (Sarah Kurchak, Consequence of Sound)

    "A lovingly observed, pitch perfect coming-of-age comedy, Gerwig's warm, astute account of the end of adolescence is a stunning solo debut." (Christopher Machell, CineVue)

    "A sweet, deeply personal portrayal of female adolescence that's more attuned to the bonds between best girlfriends than casual flings with boys, writer-director Greta Gerwig's beautiful Lady Bird flutters with the attractively loose rhythms of youth." (Tomris Laffly, Time Out New York)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Call Me by Your Name
    Wednesday March 7, 7:00p–9:12p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    Adapted from Andre Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same name, director Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash, I am Love) drenches us with the golden heat of a Northern Italian summer in his new sensual masterpiece, Call Me by Your Name.

    It is 1983, and 17-year-old music prodigy Elio (Timothée Chalamet, Lady Bird) whiles his time away by the pool in a beautiful vacation villa along with his Greco-Roman professor father (Michael Stuhlbarg, Arrival, Trumbo) and French mother (Amira Casar), while the family reads German poetry to each other. Each year, the family welcomes an academic assistant for six weeks and this year’s guest is the broad-shouldered, cocky Oliver (Armie Hammer), who could easily stand on his own among the Greek statues he studies. At first ambivalent to each other, it is not long before the mutual attraction between the wiry, hot-blooded adolescent and the Adonis in tiny shorts simmers beyond the bathroom they share.

    This time around, Guadagnino eschews his usual splashy filmmaking with a less hur­ried pace and understated storytelling, at the same time offering ripe, glowing visual details to amplify and fill in the subtext. Ultimately, the director and his cast have crafted a movie that transcends its same-sex central story to tell a universal coming-of-age story. Reflecting on human nature, family and first love, Call Me by Your Name joins the likes of Brokeback Mountain, Carol, and Moonlight in the essen­tial queer cinema canon.

    "Peachy keen. A luminous, sun-kissed Italian love story brimming with warmth, passion and feeling. This is utterly unmissable." (Josh Winning, Total Film)

    "A film that's at once light, joyful and emotionally devastating, with deeply affecting central performances. A full-hearted romantic masterpiece." (Olly Richards, Empire)

    "Outside of a few short moments in Ismail Merchant and James Ivory's Maurice, and Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain, the love and intimacy between two male characters has never truly felt this real or emotionally heartbreaking in a theatrical context. It's almost revolutionary. It's cinematic art." (Gregory Ellwood, The Playlist)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Meditation Park
    Sunday March 11, 4:00p–5:34p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In Meditation Park, Mina Shum (Ninth Floor, Double Happiness) returns to the themes that propelled her early work. The film opens with Maria (Cheng Pei Pei; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) hosting a birthday celebration for her workaholic accountant husband, Bing (Tzi Ma, Arrival). Maria reveres Bing and remains in awe of the sacrifices he has made for the family, so much so that she even respects his insistence that she not speak to their son after a long-ago slight.

    But when she finds evidence that Bing may not be the perfect person she believes him to be, she is forced to consider her world in a radically different light. Maria embarks on a journey of self-discovery by engaging with the world around her, something Bing has always discouraged. She befriends a group of local eccentrics and a rather shady neighbour, Gabriel (Don McKellar; Window Horses, Cooking with Stella). Maria soon realizes that people’s lives are much more complicated than Bing has led her to believe.

    Shum exhibits genuine compassion with her insight into the experiences of first-generation immigrant women (including showing how men control their wives by discouraging them from social interaction and learning other languages).

    Meditation Park is a charming and generous film, boasting fine performances by its leads and great support by McKellar, Liane Balaban (The Trotsky), and the star of Shum’s debut, Double Happiness, the phenomenal Sandra Oh (Window Horses), as Maria’s daughter.

    "Shum mines her favourite theme—immigrant experience in Canada—in what seems at first to be a gentle slice of life but eventually develops a powerful emotional force." (Susan G. Cole, NOW Magazine)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050

  • CINEMA
    Meditation Park
    Sunday March 11, 7:00p–8:34p
    Presented by Fundy Cinema
    ▶ Show Details

    Cost: $9

    In Meditation Park, Mina Shum (Ninth Floor, Double Happiness) returns to the themes that propelled her early work. The film opens with Maria (Cheng Pei Pei; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) hosting a birthday celebration for her workaholic accountant husband, Bing (Tzi Ma, Arrival). Maria reveres Bing and remains in awe of the sacrifices he has made for the family, so much so that she even respects his insistence that she not speak to their son after a long-ago slight.

    But when she finds evidence that Bing may not be the perfect person she believes him to be, she is forced to consider her world in a radically different light. Maria embarks on a journey of self-discovery by engaging with the world around her, something Bing has always discouraged. She befriends a group of local eccentrics and a rather shady neighbour, Gabriel (Don McKellar; Window Horses, Cooking with Stella). Maria soon realizes that people’s lives are much more complicated than Bing has led her to believe.

    Shum exhibits genuine compassion with her insight into the experiences of first-generation immigrant women (including showing how men control their wives by discouraging them from social interaction and learning other languages).

    Meditation Park is a charming and generous film, boasting fine performances by its leads and great support by McKellar, Liane Balaban (The Trotsky), and the star of Shum’s debut, Double Happiness, the phenomenal Sandra Oh (Window Horses), as Maria’s daughter.

    "Shum mines her favourite theme—immigrant experience in Canada—in what seems at first to be a gentle slice of life but eventually develops a powerful emotional force." (Susan G. Cole, NOW Magazine)

    Contact: info@fundycinema.ca  |  (902) 542-1050